Annual Continuing Education Conference

Speaker Bios

MSHA 2019 CONTINUING EDUCATION CONFERENCE SPEAKER BIOS

 

INVITED SPEAKERS:

John Greer Clark, Ph.D., is a professor of audiology at the University of Cincinnati and a former Ida Institute Faculty Fellow. A past board member for the Ohio Academy of Audiology and the American Academy of Audiology, past Chair of the American Board of Audiology and past President of the Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology, he has authored, co-authored or co-edited a number of textbooks and articles on hearing loss and hearing help. His primary research interests are adult audiologic rehabilitation, hearing loss management counseling, telehealth and animal audiology. He received the American Academy of Audiology’s Distinguished Achievement Award in 2017.

Kelly Farquharson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is an SLP, an associate professor, and director of the Children Literacy and Speech Sound Lab at Florida State University. Her research interests include school-aged children with phonological and language disorders, the effect of those disorders on the acquisition of literacy skills, and the cognitive, environmental, and academic factors that contribute to phonological and language disorders. Her work is published in the American Journal of Speech Language Pathology, the Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research, Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools, Journal of Communication Disorders, and the International Journal of Speech Language Pathology, among others.

Sandra Gillam is a Professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education at Utah State University and the immediate past Vice President for Speech Language Pathology Practice for the American Speech Language and Hearing Association (ASHA). She has received numerous awards and honors including being named ASHA Fellow, Outstanding Alumnus, Undergraduate Research Mentor of the Year, and Outstanding Researcher of the Year. She earned her BS and MS degrees in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology at Auburn University and began her career as a speech language pathologist in public schools. Dr. Gillam obtained her Doctorate at The University of Memphis and began her academic career at The University of Alabama. She currently teaches courses in language assessment and intervention for speech sound and language disorders and professional issues.  Her research interests include exploring aspects of language and literacy impairments in children with language and learning disorders. Sandi has received funding for her research from the Institute of Education Sciences. Sandi was the PI on an IES grant to develop narrative intervention procedures to improve language and literacy skills for children with language and learning impairments. She is Co-PI on a grant to conduct a randomized controlled trial of the narrative program.

Annette Hurley, Ph.D. is department head, audiology program director and associate professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at LSUHSC where she teaches courses in Central Auditory Processing Disorders and Electrophysiology. Her present research interests include CAPD, electrophysiology, and evidence for brain plasticity after auditory training.

Barbara H. Jacobson, PhD, CCC-SLP (ASHA Vice President for Standards and Ethics in Speech-Language Pathology) is associate professor and associate director of medical speech-language pathology and clinical education in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center in Nashville, Tennessee. She teaches courses in dysphagia, voice disorders, professional issues, and medical speech-language pathology and leads the Voice Specialty Track in the master’s program. Prior positions include staff speech-language pathologist at the Vanderbilt Voice Center and director of the Division of Speech-Language Sciences and Disorders at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan.

Stacey B. Landberg, M.S., CCC-SLP is a speech-language pathologist in her 14th year of professional practice. She specializes in early intervention and autism. She is a national guest speaker and she is currently completing a post-graduate fellowship related to mental health development, public policy, and early childhood development. 

Teresa Laney is a Speech Language Instructional Specialist with the Mississippi Department of Education. In this role, she provides professional development to school districts both regionally and individually as needed. She has 12 years of experience as a school-based Speech-Language Pathologist in three different districts in Mississippi. Teresa has a B.S. in Speech-Language and Audiology from the University of Southern Mississippi and an M.S. in Communication Disorders from Western Kentucky University, and is a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). She is also certified in dyslexia testing and has seven years of experience tutoring children with reading difficulties.

Megan Majoue, Au.D., CCC-A, F-AAA Assistant Professor Louisiana State University health Sciences Center

Dania Rishiq, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Audiology at the University of South Alabama. She received her doctoral degree in Speech and Hearing Science from the University of Tennessee in May 2013. Following her graduation, Rishiq worked as a Research Audiologist at Starkey Hearing Technologies (Eden Prairie, Minnesota). She later completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Mayo Clinic, in Jacksonville, Florida. Rishiq’s most recent research interests include aural rehabilitation and investigating the efficacy of auditory training programs, hearing aid research, and clinical audiology.

Scott Rubin, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Speech-Language Pathology at Louisiana State University.

Sarah E. Warren, Au.D., Ph.D., CCC-A, is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Memphis School of Communications and Disorders. As a pediatric audiologist-turned-researcher, her research interests include evidence-based practice, patient outcomes, and interprofessional practice. Dr. Warren has produced numerous presentations and publications on pediatrics and cochlear implants. In 2018, she was a core member of the American Academy of Audiology Task Force on Guidelines for Cochlear Implants, which contributed to the first national, evidence-based practice guidelines for cochlear implantation with recommendations for candidacy, surgery, programming, and long-term management.

 

SPEAKERS:

Mary Spencer Aldridge is a senior undergraduate student at the University of Mississippi, majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her research interests include aural rehabilitation in patients with hearing loss and developmental disorders, and speech perception and language development in children with hearing loss.

Josie Alston, M.A.,CCC-SLP, Chief of the Division of Speech-Language Pathology in the Department of Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Her initial experience as a voice disorder professional was obtained at the Vanderbilt Voice Center in Nashville, TN. She currently specializes in the evaluation and treatment of resonance and voice disorders in adults and children with over 20 years of experience. Mrs. Alston has presented at numerous state, regional and national conferences and has always been active with her state association. Currently she serves MSHA as Vice Chair of the Healthcare Committee. In addition, she is a Board Member for the Council of Developmental Disabilities in Mississippi.

Amitava Biswas has a PhD in Speech and Hearing Sciences and is employed as an assistant professor at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Rebekah Bosley, B.S., is a graduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Mississippi. Her research interests include literacy development in children who are typically developing or have intellectual or developmental disabilities with an emphasis on developing interventions to assist those with delayed reading ability.

Cindy Brown is native of Jackson, MS. Cindy has worked in the Healthcare field for over 23 years and 20 of those years were associated with The MS Division of Medicaid. She has been the VP of Membership of Toastmasters “Guess Who’s Talking Now” Club Number 3284 for the past 2 years. She has served as the Financial Advisor for The Jackson Rattlers AAU Basketball Team. She is a Youth Leader, Sunday school teacher and a member of the Leadership Board at Grace Inspiration Church; as well as an original Mississippi Mass Choir Member. Cindy has been married for 23 years to Percy Brown III and they have two sons; Percy Brown IV (20) and Peyton Omar Brown (19). Cindy received an Associate’s Degree from Hinds Jr. College and her Bachelors of Science Degree in Business Management from Jackson State University.

Angie Brunson, M.S., CCC-SLP is a Speech Language Pathologist at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson. She is an instructor and acute care clinician within the Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences. She completed her undergraduate degree in Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi and completed her master Degree at the University of South Alabama. Angie began her career in the state of Tennessee in the acute rehabilitation and hospital settings. She has over 20 years of experience in the field with expertise in the areas of oropharyngeal dysphagia assessment and intervention as well management within the head and neck cancer population.

Janie Cirlot-New, M.S., CCC-SLP is the Director of the T.K. Martin Center for Technology and Disability at Mississippi State University. Janie is also a Speech-language Pathologist and has provided augmentative and alternative communication services to individuals of all ages. She developed the augmentative and alternative communication evaluation and training program at the T.K. Martin Center. Janie provides training in the use of augmentative communication focusing on language with individuals who have autism and other developmental disabilities.

Steven J. Cloud, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is the SLP Graduate Program Coordinator and a professor at the University of Southern Mississippi. He has a primary interest in adult neurogenics and multicultural language issues, and he has published numerous articles and book chapters.

Cindy Cockerham has a Master’s degree and a Bachelor’s degree in Speech Language Pathology from Mississippi University for Women.  Cindy has clinical experience working with adults and children with various disorders. She is licensed by the Mississippi Department of Education and The Mississippi Department of Health. Cindy joined the T.K. Martin Center in August 2018. She is working with Project Impact’s assessment team, assessing children birth to 3 years old to determine eligibility for early intervention services through Mississippi’s First Steps Early Intervention Program. She is also working in the area of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) assessing and providing therapy for individuals with communication disorders.

Jillian Colon, M.S., CCC-SLP is a Speech Language Pathologist at The Children’s Center, she leads small groups of children with communication and developmental disabilities in addition to community-based therapy sessions with children and their families. She serves as a clinical supervisor for undergraduate and graduate students in the Speech Language Pathology program on campus.  Consultative services are provided to school districts and local preschools. As a Perkins-Roman Endorsee in the CVI Range, the endorsee conducts CVI assessment, provides consultation and technical assistance to educational teams working with a child with CVI, and provide ongoing, direct services to children with CVI. 

 

Claire Copponex, M.S. is a listening and spoken language therapist at The Children’s Center for Communication and Development on the Gulf Park campus of The University of Southern Mississippi. Claire serves children birth to five with communication needs, specializing in listening and spoken language development in children with hearing loss. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Speech Pathology and Audiology and a Master’s degree in Early Oral Intervention from The University of Southern Mississippi.

Katherine Crenshaw is a junior undergraduate student in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at the University of Mississippi and a member of the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College. Following her time at Ole Miss, Katherine plans to earn her Masters of Science in Speech-Language Pathology. Her research interests include the social parameters of speech.

Hilliary Culpepper is a speech-language pathologist at The University of Southern Mississippi DuBard School for Language Disorders. Prior to this she worked for Magnolia Speech School and then later South Central Regional Medical Center, where she also served as a speech-language pathologist. She graduated summa cum laude from the Honors College with her Bachelor of Arts in 2008 and Master's in Speech Pathology in 2009 from The University of Southern Mississippi. She currently holds the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) from the American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA) and is a Certified Academic Language Therapist (CALT).

Anise Flowers received her Ph.D. in Clinical Child Psychology from Louisiana State University. She has been an Assessment Consultant with Pearson for the past 15 years. Anise has presented numerous workshops and conference presentations on a variety of assessment topics including several presentations at the annual TSHA & Arksha conferences.

Edward L. Goshorn, Ph.D., CCC-A/SLP. Director, School of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Associate Dean, College of Nursing & Health Professions. Over 40 years experience in clinical audiology and academe. Presented numerous papers at national and state meetings. Published numerous peer-reviewed articles in scholarly journals.

Kara Hawthorne is an assistant professor of Hearing, Speech, and Language Sciences at Gallaudet University. Her research focuses on prosody across multiple populations.

Kym Heine CCC-SLP regional consultant for the Prentke Romich Company has worked exclusively in the field of AAC since receiving her Masters in 1982. She has been employed in a variety of settings to include rehabilitation centers, hospitals and outpatient clinics. She previously owned a private practice which provided contractual services emphasizing the training of AAC facilitators in schools, group homes, residential facilities, and private homes. Kym is a frequent presenter at conferences on topics relating to the use of speech generating devices and has presented at ASHA, ATIA, and numerous state conferences in both Louisiana and Mississippi.

Katie Hester is a senior undergraduate student at the University of Mississippi, studying Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her research interests include language development, hearing protection, and audiologic disorders.

Carolyn Wiles Higdon, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a professor at the University of Mississippi/UM Medical Center, and CEO: Wiles Higdon & Associates, LLC. Dr. Higdon holds national/international committee/board appointments, with a significant publication history. Her credentials include department chair, association president and chair of state licensing boards. Her honors include Fellow of ASHA, Phi Kappa Phi, and Honors of MSHA and CAPSCD. Dr. Higdon is a University of Alabama Faculty Scholar in Geriatrics. Dr. Higdon’s holds bachelor/master degrees from Kent State University and doctorate from the University of Georgia.

Toni Hollingsworth earned her Bachelors of Science degree in Education of the Deaf with special emphasis in Education of the Blind from The University of Southern Mississippi in 1980. After several years of teaching in the classroom, she completed a Master of Science degree in Rehabilitation of the Sensory Impaired with special emphasis in Deaf-Blindness and Education of the Deaf in 1984 from McDaniel College, Westminster, Maryland. She previously was employed by The Maryland School for the Blind in Baltimore, Maryland as the Enhanced Services Coordinator with the primary duties of coordinating trainings, services, and securing resources for staff and families of children receiving the most intense services, including students who are deaf-blind. In her current position as Director of the Mississippi Hearing-Vision Project at USM, she provides technical assistance to Mississippi families and educators of children who are deaf-blind, and engages in state-wide systemic change initiatives. In addition to the Project work of the past twelve years, she has supported activities of the National Deaf-Blind Equipment Distribution Program known as iCanConnect in Mississippi since the grant was in pilot phase. Toni is currently serving as Treasurer for the Mississippi Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired, and was honored by her colleagues for her service to the organization in 2016 when she was presented the John Maxson Outstanding Service Award.

Janette Hreish, M.S., CCC-SLP is a speech language pathologist at T.K. Martin Center for Technology and Disability. She earned her Master of Science degree in speech-language pathology at the University of Southern Mississippi. She holds a Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech-Language and Hearing Association. She also holds a Bachelor of Science degree in speech-language pathology from Mississippi University for Women. At the T.K. Martin Center, she works in the area of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) focusing on evaluations, training, and research. She provides AAC evaluations for children and adults throughout the entire state of Mississippi who have speech/language impairments. She also provides therapy focusing on augmentative and alternative communication.

Rachel Huber, Au.D., is an audiologist and assistant professor at the Mississippi University for Women. She is interested in amplification and management of single-sided hearing loss. Dr. Huber is working on her Ph.D. in audiology with a focus in psychoacoustics.

Katherine Hubbard is an undergraduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Mississippi. Her research interests include language and literacy in Down syndrome and the use of AAC devices in intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Ginger Jones is a speech-language pathologist with over 15 years experience and the Founder and CEO of Jones Therapy Services. She began her career at the Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center working there for almost 7 years before leaving to start Jones Therapy Services. Since she started my company in November of 2009, the company grown to 9 locations across the state of Tennessee with a growing staff of more than 80 employees. Jones Therapy Services has received many awards such as ranking on the INC 5000 list for three years in a row.

Rachel Jenkins is an undergraduate student pursuing her degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Mississippi. She hopes to attend graduate school to obtain her MS in Speech-Language Pathology. She is interested in researching children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Misa Kayama is an Assistant Professor of Social Work at the University of Mississippi.  Her research focuses on the experiences of school-aged children with disabilities, their parents, and educators, including parent-educator collaboration.

Hortencia Kayser, Ph.D. is Professor of speech language pathology at Mississippi University for Women. She is a graduate of the University of Arizona (M.S.) and New Mexico State University (Ph.D.). Dr. Kayser has trained bilingual speech language pathologists and written books & articles concerning the treatment and assessment of bilingual children. She is an ASHA Fellow and has received the Award for Contributions to Multicultural Affairs.

Sara Keefe is an undergraduate student at the University of Mississippi, studying Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her research interest include auditory physiology, hearing instruments, and forms of alternative communication.

Susan Loveall is an Assistant Professor in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Mississippi. Her research interests include language and literacy in intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Rebecca Lowe, Au.D, CCC-A is a clinical assistant professor at the University of Mississippi and co-director of the University of Mississippi Speech and Hearing Center. Her research interests include audiologic rehabilitation, audiologic disorders, and hearing protection.

Janie Magee is a Speech-Language Pathologist and a full-time faculty member at Delta State University in Cleveland, Mississippi. She has served as the DSU Speech and Hearing Clinical Director since 2011.

  1. Hunter Manasco Ph.D. CCC-SLP completed his doctorate at the University of South Alabama. Dr. Manasco’s areas of specialization include neuroanatomy, aphasia, motor speech disorders, traumatic brain injury, and autism. He has taught in the field of Speech-Language Pathology for ten years. He has worked clinically in acute care, long-term care, hospice, adult rehabilitation, as well as in school and hospital based pediatrics. He has presented and published numerous research papers in his areas of specialty. He is best for known for his textbook An Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders published by Jones and Bartlett Learning and his children’s book An Exceptional Children’s Guide to Touch published by Jessica Kingsley of London.

Jamie Mann is a senior undergraduate student at the University of Mississippi. She will graduate in May with a Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders and a minor in Psychology.

Charles G Marx, Au.D., CCC-A is an Audiologist and Associate Professor at The University of Southern Mississippi. A graduate of Mississippi State University (B.A.) and the University of Southern Mississippi (M.S., Au.D.), Dr. Marx teaches courses involving the electrophysiological assessment of hearing and balance. His primary clinical duties at the University involve the electrophysiological assessment of hearing in infants and young children and general Pediatric and Adult behavioral audiometry. Prior to working at USM, Dr. Marx served as the director of Wesley Medical Center’s Neurodiagnostics Department for 25 years. Ashley Grillis; Dr. Ashley Grillis joined the University of Mississippi Medical Center faculty in January 2017 and serves as the Director of Pediatric Audiology Services. After receiving her B.S. in biology in 2008 from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Grillis obtained her Au.D. in 2013 at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Knoxville.

Susanna McDonald, M.S., LSLS is a listening and spoken language therapist at The Children’s Center for Communication and Development at the University of Southern Mississippi. Susanna works closely with families of children with varying degrees of hearing loss to help them implement auditory strategies in their daily routines to stimulate spoken language ages birth through 5 years. Susanna serves on the executive board of the Mississippi Chapter of AG Bell in order to support and provide resources to parents and professionals throughout the state.

Caroline Murray, M.S., CCC-SLP is currently a Speech-Language Pathologist at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. She graduated with her undergraduate and master's degree from Kansas State University. Currently she specializes in treating patients with head and neck cancer, dysphagia and voice disorders.

Kendal Pearson is a senior undergraduate student at the University of Mississippi, studying Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her research interests include audiologic rehabilitation in developmental disabilities.

Whitney Perkins, M.S., CCC-SLP, is clinical coordinator, instructor, and NSSHLA advisor in the Department of Communicative Disorders at Jackson State University (JSU). She has graduate degrees in both Deaf Education and Communicative Disorders. With interests in early intervention, she is currently a doctoral student in Early Childhood Education at JSU.

Rachel K. Powell, PhD, CCC-SLP, received her Master’s degree from The University of Southern Mississippi, and her Doctorate of Philosophy degree from Louisiana State University. She specializes in language development and disorders, and literacy acquisition and disorders. She has been employed as a speech-language pathologist, diagnostician, and instructional specialist in public schools for 15 years. She is currently employed as a speech-language pathologist in Brookhaven School District, and has taught as an Adjunct Professor, teaching coursework in language, literacy, and speech sound disorders. She is a past-president of the Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and currently serves as Legislative Chair. Rachel has been invited to present regionally on topics including language/speech evaluation, development of standards-based IEPs, and the language foundations of literacy. She has presented nationally on topics including curriculum-based interventions, response to intervention, and service delivery models. Rachel recently published an article in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools titled “Unique Contributors to the Curriculum: From Research to Practice for Speech-Language Pathologists in Schools.”

Haley Rishel, M.A, is a listening and spoken language therapist at The Children’s Center for Communication and Development on the Gulf Park Campus of The University of Southern Mississippi. She teaches and coaches families with children affected by hearing loss to develop listening and language in home, school, and community settings. She holds a Special Education Bachelor’s degree from the University of Mississippi and a Master’s degree in Early Intervention in Deaf Education from Fontbonne University in St. Louis, Missouri. Haley has 15 years’ experience working with children with hearing loss and their families in Missouri, Texas, and Mississippi. While in Texas, Haley was the preschool coordinator for Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children, where she co-authored an early childhood curriculum, which focuses on the specific needs of students with hearing loss. Before working with children through The Children’s Center, Haley provided services to children with hearing loss and/or developmental delays and their families at Magnolia Speech School and Long Beach School District. Haley works with First Steps Early Intervention whereby she educates and counsels families with young children with hearing loss and provides information on local resources for audiological testing and management, as well as communication and educational options available in Mississippi. She also teaches both undergraduate and graduate level classes at The University of Southern Mississippi Deaf Education departments.

Melissa A. Ladner, M.S., CCC-SLP, is from Biloxi, MS. Melissa served as the Vice President of School Issues and Chair of the Schools Committee from 2013-2018. The Schools Committee actively represented MSHA at the Mississippi Department of Education and other educationally relevant organizations. The Schools Committee has a long history of promoting SLP’s in the state and improving work conditions to increase the quality of services to children with communicative impairments. She is currently serving as 2019 Honors Chair. Overall, the Schools Committee is dedicated to advocating for Mississippi’s children and the Speech Language Pathologists that serve in the school environment.

Lauren Robinson is currently a speech-language pathologist at The University of Southern Mississippi DuBard School for Language Disorders. Prior to this, she worked for Lauderdale County School District and Mid-South Rehab Services where she also served as a speech-language pathologist. She completed her Bachelor’s of Arts in 2011 and Master’s in Speech Pathology in 2013 from The University of Southern Mississippi. She currently holds the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC) from the American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA) and is a Certified Academic Language Therapist (CALT).

Hannah Sanders, M.S, CCC-SLP is a speech-language pathologist at The Children's Center for Communication and Development at The University of Southern Mississippi where she provides services to children ages birth-5, the majority of whom are on the autism spectrum. Hannah also serves as The Children's Center's practicum coordinator for graduate students, undergraduate students, and student volunteers.

Madison Savoy, B.S., is a graduate student in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Mississippi. Her research interests include early social and cognitive aspects of language development and learning in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Courtney Turner, Au.D., CCC-A is an educational audiologist at The Children’s Center for Communication and Development and adjunct professor and clinical supervisor in the School of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi. Dr. Turner provides clinical and educational audiology services to children from birth to 5 years of age, as well as transitional support for students entering school. Dr. Turner serves on the advocacy committee of the Educational Audiology Association and the MSHA audiology committee. She is currently serving as VP Public Relations & Marketing for MSHA.

Rachel Tyrone, M.S, CCC-SLP is a Speech Language Pathologist at the University of Mississippi Medical Center where I have specialized in the evaluation and treatment of pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders. I obtained my BS and MS in Speech Pathology from the University of Southern Mississippi. I am currently studying for my PhD in Population Health Sciences through the University of Mississippi Medical Center. This is the first school of Population Health in Mississippi and is one of only a handful of programs in the country.

Emma Kate Thome is a first year graduate student in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at the University of Mississippi. Her research interests include SLPs’ use of evidence-based practice.

Mary T. Schaub, MS, CCC-SLP Assist. Prof. of Speech-Language Pathology University of Southern Mississippi. Received an MS in Communication Disorders from the University of Wyoming. Is currently Assistant Professor of Speech-Language Pathology at the University of Southern Mississippi, Coordinator for Undergraduate Studies in Speech and Hearing Sciences, Coordinator for Graduate Externships in Speech Pathology, and clinical supervisor in speech pathology. Serves as a consultant to Millcreek Rehabilitation Centers and Ellisville State School.

Jessamyn Schertz is an Assistant Professor in Linguistics at the University of Toronto. Her research focuses on speech perception and production.

Christopher Spankovich, AuD, PhD, MPH is an Associate Professor and Vice Chair of Research for the Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Dr. Spankovich obtained his Master of Public Health from Emory University (Atlanta, GA), AuD from Rush University (Chicago, IL), and PhD from Vanderbilt University (Nashville, TN). He is a clinician-scientist with a translational research program focused on prevention and treatment of acquired forms of hearing loss, tinnitus, and sound sensitivity. His research includes clinical trials of otoprotectant agents, epidemiological studies of determinants (e.g. dietary quality) of hearing loss and tinnitus, basic research in thermal stress for prevention of ototoxicity, and translational research on the effects of noise on auditory physiology and perception. Dr. Spankovich’s clinical interests include tinnitus, sound sensitivity, ototoxicity, hearing conservation, and auditory evoked potentials.

Rebecca Sabine is an undergraduate Audiology student in the Honors College at USM. She is fascinated with how sound is processed by the ear and brain. She also has a passion for advocating for hearing protection, especially among my peers. The presentation will share the results of her Honor's thesis study about the hearing protection knowledge and behaviors of college students.

Kelly Spence has worked as a speech language pathologist for the Neshoba County School District for the past six years. She received a Master’s degree at Nova Southeastern University and an Educational Specialist Degree from Arkansas State University in Special Education Administration and Building Level Administration were completed in 2017. Mrs. Spence’s professional duties have included eighteen years of experience in the public school setting; currently she serves as Vice President: School Issues for the Mississippi Speech and Hearing Association. She has worked with preschool, elementary, and high school aged students. Mrs. Spence has served as Preschool Child Find which entailed diagnostics for developmental delays, diagnostic for language delays, developing therapy objectives, and collaboration with teachers and families. She has worked with building level educational agencies to provide knowledge to enhance the educational performance of preschool, and kindergarten through fourth grade students for literacy skills through professional development. She has partnered with special service providers through working with intellectually challenged students to help improve a broad range of developmental milestones.

Alicia Swann, M.C.D, CCC-A, is a board-certified educational audiologist with over 23 years’ experience in assessment and treatment of auditory processing disorder (APD). She is the owner of Auditory Processing Center, LLC, a private practice in Clinton, MS, specializing in APD evaluations and therapy for children and adults. She has developed auditory curriculums for listening skill development and auditory processing intervention, co-authored research articles on diagnosis and treatment of amblyaudia (lazy ear), and has expertise in developing listening and spoken language skills in children with communication disorders, cochlear implant recipients, and hearing aid users. Alicia received her M.C.D. in Audiology from Auburn University, and is a certified member of the American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), Board Certified in Audiology through the American Board of Audiology, a Fellow of the American Academy of Audiology, and is a licensed Audiologist and Audiology Educator as well as active member of the International Guild of Auditory Processing Specialists. Alicia presents nationally on Auditory Processing Disorder, and frequently provides consultations, in-services, and presentations for professional organizations.

Anita Thames, M. S. CCC-SLP has been a Clinical Instructor at the University of Southern Mississippi for three years. She has taught language development, phonetics, language disorders and assessment in speech-language pathology on the undergraduate level and speech sound disorders on the graduate level. Mrs. Thames has extensive experience in assessment and treatment of speech sound disorders, language impairments, developmental delays in children.

Shantel Walters, CCC-SLP graduated with her Master's degree from Southeastern Louisiana University in May of 2014. She has worked in the Franklin County School system providing speech/language services to preschool, upper elementary, middle school, and high school students. At the middle and high school level, she leads social skills groups with students who have autism or other social communication difficulties. Since being introduced to the Hanen Center in graduate school, she has been trained to lead two of their programs: It Takes Two to Talk and More Than Words.

Kimberly Ward is an Assistant Professor and Audiologist at The University of Southern Mississippi, where she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses. Ward also serves as the audiology clinic director at USM, serving clients of all ages in her specialties of implantable hearing devices, pediatric audiology, and educational support. She has served two terms as the chair of ASHA's Medicaid Committee. She is President of MSHA for the 2019-2020 term.

Alison Webster, MS, CCC-SLP, CALT, CERI-SLDS, is the professional development coordinator at the DuBard School for Language Disorders at The University of Southern Mississippi. She is a nationally certified speech-language pathologist, certified academic language therapist, and a Center for Effective Reading Instruction structured literacy dyslexia specialist. She holds Mississippi licensure in Speech-Language Pathology (K-12) and an endorsement in Mild to Moderate Disabilities in Special Education(K-12). She is a member of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the Academic Language Therapy Association and the Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The University of Southern Mississippi.

Alissa Ann Williams is an undergraduate Honors College student in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Mississippi. Her research interests consist of parents’ perspectives of their role and understanding in their child’s speech and language therapy.

Mary Alden Wing is a senior undergraduate student at the University of Mississippi, studying Communication Sciences and Disorders. Her research interests include auditory rehabilitation with children who have hearing loss.

Alexis Zosel is a junior at the University of Mississippi studying Communication Sciences and Disorders with a minor focus in Spanish and Psychology. She is currently involved in research surrounding foreign accent perception.