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2022 Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association Conference Pre-Conference Timed Agenda, Learning Objectives, and Speaker Disclosures

 

Wednesday, September 21, 2022, Pre-Conference

Title: 

The Elephant in the Speech-Language Therapy Room … BEHAVIOR!

Author:

Jennifer Buhrmann

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

6 hours

Abstract: 

This formidable foe finds its way into our therapy sessions….regularly. It does NO ONE any good to pretend otherwise! What can we really do about it? Is addressing it even speech-language therapy? A clinician will share practical tips to help guide you in your quest to gain the upper hand!

Learning Objectives:

Following the sessions, participants will be able to:

 

1.    Identify the 3-Part Model for effective treatment planning that accounts for common needs in dealing with challenging behaviors.

 

2.    Identify a reason for each part of the 3-Part Model for effective treatment planning.

 

3.    Identify the steps in evaluating a challenging behavior and make a speech-language therapy application of that information.

 

4.    Pair at least 3 common challenging behaviors with a cost-effective, language-based, behavior management tool.

Biography: 

This presenter has been a field clinician for 20+ years. She has worked in a variety of settings and with a number of different populations, including autism spectrum disorder. She has served as an interdisciplinary evaluator/consultant and speech-language pathology supervisor, as well. During her work, she has seen and consulted with many clinicians (and educators/caregivers) who struggle in working with clients with challenging behaviors (with varying degrees of openness). Working alongside other disciplines in treating an array of function/behavior levels, she has had the opportunity to observe many different strategies and learn how to apply them to specific client situations. There are some practical, cost-effective, tools, strategies, and tips, that can often go a long way in assisting clinicians in gaining control of challenging situations to build positive relationships with clients and result in progress in speech/language function. The rationale behind why and how to use these tools/strategies will be shared, so participants have a better understanding of the related foundational concepts, and are better prepared to apply them appropriately to a variety of situations spanning a range of complexity. Additionally, the actual tools/strategies themselves will be shared, with application to client case examples.

Disclosures:

Jennifer Buhrmann, Joyful Noises and UT Health San Antonio

Disclosure:

Financial–  Consulting fee, Intellectual property rights, Speaking fee, Royalty, Honoraria, Ownership interest (e.g. stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest excluding diversified mutual funds)

Employment, Teaching and speaking, Ownership, Consulting, Independent contractor (including contracted research)

Nonfinancial-  Although this presentation is not designed to focus on Jennifer’s published materials, it should be noted that she believes in the value of multi-modal types of learning opportunities (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), such as music (when used appropriately by relevant personnel), in working with individuals with special needs.   She is an educator of graduate speech-language pathology students with UT Health-San Antonio.

 


2022 Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association Conference Timed Agenda, Learning Objectives, and Speaker Disclosures

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Thursday, September 22, 2022, 7:00 am

Registration Packet Pick-up Begins

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 8:00-9:30

Title: 

Developing and Implementing a Culturally Responsive Stuttering Assessment for Children

Author:

Kia Noelle Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1.5 hours

Abstract: 

Continuous growth in cultural and linguistic diversity within the United States influences service delivery to children from diverse backgrounds. Research findings and clinical observations indicate differences in the presentation of speech disfluencies as well as related behaviors in culturally/linguistically diverse individuals. Together, these factors motivate a need to revisit traditional assessment procedures in stuttering and adjust assessment protocols to be more culturally sensitive to differences that may impact clinical decision-making related to questions of stuttering. This session will discuss these cultural differences as well as cultural considerations for stuttering assessments with children.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Summarize research findings on stuttering in culturally and linguistically diverse populations.

 

2.    Explain the difference between a traditional stuttering assessment and a culturally responsive stuttering assessment.

 

3.    Explain how cultural and linguistic diversity can impact stuttering.

Biography: 

Kia Noelle Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is the Associate Director of the Arthur M. Blank Center for Stuttering Education and Research Satellite in Atlanta, Georgia through the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Johnson specializes in developmental stuttering with a focus on culturally diverse populations. She is also a growing leader in providing workshops and presentations on topics related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in clinical and professional settings.  She has contributed service to the profession through several volunteer roles and has mentored countless undergraduate and graduate students within the profession. She serves as Chair of the Board of Directors for the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing, is a member of Board of Directors for the ASHA, and also serves as the National Advisor to the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association. 

Disclosures:

Kia Johnson, PhD, CCC-SLP       

Financial – Honoraria from MSHA; Teaching and speaking

Nonfinancial – ASHA; NBASLH; National NSSLHA; Member of the Board of Directors (ASHA & NBASLH); National Advisor (NSSLHA); Board membership                                                                                                             

 

 

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 8:00-10:00

Title: 

Primary Progressive Aphasia: Promising Directions for Assessment and Treatment

Author:

Elizabeth Burklow, MA, CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

2 hours

Abstract: 

Most SLPs have heard of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA) and know it to be a devastating diagnosis. But many SLPs don't feel competent in differential diagnosis, assessment of deficits, and treatment options. Until very recently, treatment options have been limited to compensatory strategies. This presentation will provide clinicians with the tools needed to diagnosis and treat PPA based on the particular variation and clinical presentation. Compensatory and restorative treatment options will be discussed, and the evidence to support those options will be provided.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Differentiate between the 3 variations of Primary Progressive Aphasia.

 

2.    List the assessment tools needed the or diagnosis of PPA.

 

3.    Provide at least 1 evidence-based restorative and compensatory treatment method for each variation of PPA.

Biography: 

Elizabeth Burklow, MA, CCC-SLP, Instructor and SLP at Ole Miss, received her bachelor’s degree at Ole Miss and Master's degree at the University of Memphis. She spent 18 years in Tampa, FL then Birmingham, AL working in medical settings with both adults and pediatrics before moving into a clinical supervisory role in higher education. Since joining the Dept of CSD, she has added programs to the Speech and Hearing Center focused on adult services, including assessment and treatment for voice, cognition, language, motor speech, and dysphagia.

Disclosures:

Elizabeth Burklow, MA, CCC-SLP - University of Mississippi 

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 8:30-9:30

Title: 

The Clinical Use of Syntactic and Semantic Measures in Literacy Intervention

Author:

Kelly Koch

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

This case study research looks at the clinical relevancy of measuring syntactic and semantic change in developing writers. Four school-aged participants with various language disorders took part in a weekly Writer’s Workshop (Avery, 2002), in which each author was supported in the creation of their text by either a student clinician or the researcher. Data taken at the beginning of each semester included an Oral Reading Miscue Analysis (Goodman, Watson, & Burke, 1987) using a sentence level analysis (Davenport, 2002) which results in the number of syntactically acceptable and semantically acceptable sentences constructed by the reader. Writing samples were taken every session and analyzed for minimal terminal units constructed (t-units, Nippold, 2014) and subordination index (SI, Price & Jackson, 2015), which measure syntactic length and complexity of the writing sample respectively. These measures allowed the clinical effectiveness of therapy to be described and did not dramatically change the communicative context of reading and writing, while also providing clinically relevant measures of language change in each of the participants.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Describe measures of syntax and semantics relevant to literacy therapy

 

2.    Develop an assessment plan for literacy therapy relevant to clients’ language needs

 

3.    Assess syntactic and semantic change in clients’ language usage

Biography: 

Dr. Kelly Koch is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Mississippi and a licensed and certified Speech Language Pathologist. Dr. Koch has worked clinically as school-based SLP and a private practice SLP, as well as a university-based supervisor. Her research interests include Autism, childhood communication development, and communication disorders.

Disclosures:

Kelly Koch, PhD, CCC-SLP – The University of Southern Mississippi         

Financial – Salary; Employment; Assistant professor

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 8:30-9:30

Title: 

Psychometric Properties of a few Practical Screening Tools for Hearing Sensitivity for Self-Administration

Author:

Amitava Biswas, Ph.D.; Steve Cloud, PhD, CCC-SLP; Jennifer Goshorn, CCC-AUD

Instructional Level: 

Varied

Time: 

1.0

Abstract: 

Just like blood pressure, personal audiometric screening is often desirable, for example, after effortful swimming, extensive fun time at a water park, exposure to loud noise or loud music someone may wonder whether the hearing sensitivity has dropped. Usually, a complete audiometric assessment need not be done before a basic screening test. But a screening test normally requires a screening audiometer. In textbooks, some authors describe how to use simple gadgets such as tuning forks. But tuning forks are not easily available to ordinary citizens. In this presentation, we will discuss a few practical alternatives, such as, whispering, scratching, finger snapping, finger rubbing, pill rolling, etc. Such procedures may be known to many individuals but there is very little discussion in professional literature. We will explore some of the desirable psychometric characteristics of these alternatives. One important characteristic is the convenience of self-administration. Somewhat similar to the biologic calibration of audiometers, one may get used to checking own hearing sensitivity by these procedures. Another desirable feature is the ability to change the relative intensity of the stimulus. This may be achieved by changing the distance between the source of the stimulus sound and the receiving ear. One logical extension of this feature is to position the source at equal distance from both ears and comparing their relative sensitivity. Other important issues, such as, reliability, and validity, will be discussed based upon preliminary investigations.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.      understand the important psychometric properties of a personal screening tool.

 

2.      apply practical procedures to develop a personal screening tool.

 

3.     compare the performance of these personal screening tools with regular audiometers.

Biography: 

Dr. Biswas earned his PhD in Speech and Hearing Sciences about 17 years ago from Indiana University, Bloomington. He is a tenured Associate Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi.

 

Disclosures:

Steve Cloud, Ph.D., CCC-SLP – University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Amitava Biswas, Ph.D. – University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Jennifer Goshorn, CCC-AUD

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 10:00-11:00

Title: 

Changing Your View: Reflection-Driven Supervision

Author:

Janie Magee, Ed. D., CCC-SLP; Gina Jenkins, M.S., CCC-SLP & Lesley Mancini, M.S., CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Varied

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

The task of clinical supervision is one in which the clinical practitioner must exhibit adaptability and flexibility while simultaneously demonstrating the highest level clinical and professional competencies. The presenters in this 60-minute session will explain how self-reflection, an integral part of metacognition, relates to both personal growth and evaluation and that of those we supervise. Attendees will self-evaluate their supervisory beliefs and practices and examine how those correspond to the supervisory behavior continuum. Further, strategies to help supervisees improve independent critical thinking and problem-solving skills will be explored.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Define supervisory beliefs, supervisory challenges, and apply the principles of self-reflection to examine your supervisory approach using characteristics from Glickam’s (2018) supervisor behavior continuum.

 

2.    Describe how guided self-reflection influences metacognitive growth in both the supervisee and the supervisor

 

3.    Apply principles of self-reflection to create opportunities for critical thinking and facilitate more independent problem-solving in your supervisee.

Biography: 

Janie Park Magee, Ed. D., CCC-SLP is a Speech-Language Pathologist from Leland, Mississippi. She received her Master of Arts in Communication Sciences and Disorders from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and her Doctor of Education degree from Delta State University with a concentration in Higher Education. Currently, she is a full-time faculty member at Delta State University in the Speech & Hearing Sciences Department and serves as the Clinical Director of the Delta State University Speech and Hearing Clinic. Special areas of interest include the supervisory process, the scholarship of teaching and learning, neurogenic, and metacognition.

Disclosures:

Janie Magee, Ed. D., CCC-SLP - Delta State University         

Financial – Employment, Teaching and speaking; DSU pays my salary and PTO to present at professional conferences.    

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Gina Jenkins MS, CCC-SLP         

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Lesley Mancini, CCC-SLP - Delta State University                  

Financial – Salary; Employment; Instructor in Speech and Hearing Sciences

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 10:00-11:30

Title: 

Speech-Language Professional Growth Rubric: What's New?

Author:

Teresa Laney M.S., CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1.5 hours

Abstract: 

Speech-Language Pathologists carry out formal and information assessments on students within the school, while making recommendations for students who are in need of speech-language services. The purpose of the Speech-Language Growth Rubric is to guide the continuous professional growth of Speech-Language Pathologists (215) and Speech Associates (216) and determine if the SLP or SA is meeting professional standards, considering their specific roles and responsibilities. The revised rubric highlights the speech-language professional's areas of strength and identify areas of growth. The Speech-Language Growth Rubric serves as a guide for speech and language professionals as they reflect on their own practices and promotes shared understanding of priorities and expectations between therapists and administrators.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Understand the roles and responsibilities of the Speech-Language Pathologist (215) and the Speech Associate (216).

 

2.    List the domains and standards of the revised Professional Growth Rubric.

 

3.    Understand the rating scale and learn ways to promote success.

Biography: 

Teresa Laney, M.S., CCC-SLP, is the Speech/Language and Related Services Consultant for the Mississippi Department of Education. In this capacity, she provides professional development and coaching to school-based speech-language pathologists and teachers for the Office of Special Education. She is certified in dyslexia assessment and has nine years of experience tutoring children with dyslexia.

Disclosures:

Teresa Laney M.S., CCC-SLP – Mississippi Department of Education

Financial – Salary; Employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 10:30-11:30

Title: 

Unconventional Utility of Electroglottography for Monitoring Deglutition

Author:

Amitava Biswas, PhD; Steve Cloud, PhD, CCC-SLP; Mary Schaub, MS, CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Varied

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

Electroglottography is commonly useful in the clinic to monitor glottal abduction and adduction during phonation. We have recently noticed that it may be useful to monitor lingual contact with the palate during articulation of speech sounds. This presentation extends that concept further to include pharyngeal compression during deglutition.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

  1. understand important features of conventional electroglottography.

 

  1. apply practical procedures to monitor pharyngeal compression during deglutition.

 

  1. compare this procedure with other available options.

Biography: 

Dr. Biswas earned his PhD in Speech and Hearing Sciences about 17 years ago from Indiana University, Bloomington. He is a tenured Associated Professor of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi.

Disclosures:

Amitava Biswas, Ph.D. – The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Steve Cloud, Ph.D., CCC-SLP – The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Mary Schaub, MS, CCC-SLP – The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 10:30-11:30

Title: 

False and Exaggerated Hearing Loss: Terminology and Rationale

Author:

James Peck, Ph.D.

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

This paper is about terminology used in regard to false and exaggerated hearing loss, FEHL. A companion paper discusses characteristics and management of FEHL. Attending one session is not dependent on attending the other. Psychosocial problems are common in FEHL, and audiologists can screen for them. Doing so is facilitated by using appropriate terminology. Inconsistent audiologic results go under different labels, which are neither synonymous nor accurate. The phrase “false and exaggerated hearing loss” is proposed as the most suitable phrase term. Proper terminology helps the clinician to identify possible psychosocial problems and the need for further management.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Explain the difference between an organic disorder and a nonorganic disorder.

 

2.    Name and discuss those terms used to label FEHL that relate to state of mind.

 

3.    Outline the Austen-Lynch (2004) model of dimensions of invalid responses.

Biography: 

James E. Peck, Ph.D. associate professor emeritus University of Mississippi Medical Center. Dr. Peck obtained his doctorate in audiology from Vanderbilt University. He spent his career as a clinician-teacher. His major interest is false and exaggerated hearing loss, about which he has given state and national presentations. His book, Pseudohypacusis: False and Exaggerated Hearing Loss, is the only book on the topic. He is also the author of the chapter on pseudohypacusis in the Comprehensive Handbook of Pediatric Audiology.

Disclosures:

James Peck, Ph.D.

Financial – Royalties from book publishing

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 11:30-1:30 – Keynote Speaker; lunch provided

Title: 

Pain Into Purpose

Author:

Dwight Owens

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1.5 hour

Abstract: 

Dwight Owens details his trauma experience of his miraculous journey and beyond after his career was cut short from being hit by a drunk driver on the way to school in 2005. Despite being physically paralyzed as a result of the accident, Dwight turned tragedy to triumph and has been nationally recognized as a disability advocate and motivational speaker. Realizing individuals with disabilities need encouragement, especially after a prolonged Covid-19 pandemic, this session will deliver motivation and empowerment in a unique way.

 

Thriving with a disability is no task for the meek.  Every day strains your body and your character.  Every day brings new challenges, and every day is a test of endurance.  But every day is also an opportunity for victory, and that’s what matters most.  It is not just about the struggles people in the disabled community face, although that’s important.  It is not just the setbacks they encounter.  What matters most is to go on, to make a difference, and to contribute in a positive way to the world around us.  That’s what matters, and that’s what this session about.

 

Dwight believes that it’s important to face obstacles head on, put them in the best possible light and help others every chance you get. With that in mind, the session is designed for Dwight (1) to be a beacon of HOPE through motivation, (2) to give resources, (3) and to encourage individuals with disabilities to get involved in leadership or becoming active in their communities.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.     Describe how to overcome obstacles in a unique, motivating way.

 

2.     List a variety of resources for overcoming obstacles

 

3.     Describe how to become a leader in their community despite any challenges or disabilities.

Biography: 

In 2005, at the age of 23, Dwight was in a horrible car accident.  After only 1 year of high school teaching, a 72-year-old drunk driver crashed into Dwight’s vehicle and his life was changed forever.  Dwight had broken bones, punctured lungs, a broken back, brain trauma, a severed spinal cord, a year in the hospital and a lifetime of paralysis ahead of him.   In fact, Dwight coded immediately after the accident and the doctors gave him no chance to survive.  But survive he did, and what could have become a life of depression, self-pity, and bitterness has instead transformed into one of uplifting courage, self-reliance, and forgiveness.  After surviving life support and an entire year in the hospital, Dwight found the courage to turn tragedy into triumph, and has become a motivational speaker sought after throughout Mississippi and beyond. Receiving several local, state, and national awards for his service, including the National “Spirit of Service” award hosted by Al Roker at Radio Music City Hall, he is also an author and well-known advocate for mental health awareness, disability awareness, alcohol & drug addiction prevention, and beyond. He received his Master of Business Administration (MBA) from The University of Southern Mississippi and is currently pursuing his Doctorate degree in Educational Leadership. Fourteen years ago, Dwight married Tamika, the love of his life, and the couple had their first child, Brailey Samara Owens, on 12/12/12. 

Disclosures:

Dwight Owens, MBA

Financial – Honorarium from MSHA

Nonfinancial - National "Spirit of Service" Award Winner        

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 1:30-2:30

Title: 

Food for Thought

Author:

KK Harrington, MS CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

The role of food in human culture is generally undervalued unless it is gone. Food is more than just about sustenance but about an emotional connection with others.  People know that we live in a food-oriented society, but have they ever stopped to wonder about what all they may be giving up if it was taken away or changed? Speech Language Pathologists are uniquely aware of the physiology of swallowing and how important eating is to patients and their families. Part of our role is to evaluate and treat patients with swallowing disorders. When we give our recommendations as part of this process, we must be cognizant of the importance food culture is to our patients, if aspiration is really a factor, how we can modify diets well and at the end-of-life, can we give our patients a good quality of death?

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1. Describe the value the importance of food in a variety of cultures

 

2. Define the importance of aspiration and why it does/does not affect patients

 

3. Explain how to modify a diet well if needed and how to participate in patient's quality of death

Biography: 

- Owner/Endoscopist of Mississippi Dysphagia Specialists (A Mobile FEES Company)

- Employed PRN at the University of Mississippi Medical Center

- Employed as Adjunct Professor at Jackson State University

- Over 10 years of experience specializing in dysphagia evaluation and treatment in acute care hospitals, outpatient/inpatient facilities and skilled nursing facilities

Disclosures:

KK Harrington - Mississippi Dysphagia Specialists

Financial – Salary; Employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 1:30-3:30

Title: 

Ethics: Because People Matter!

Author:

Jennifer Buhrmann

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

Ethics is vital in every SLP’s practice. Some situations encountered are straightforward. However, what happens when they’re not? Is adherence to the written rules all that is needed? This presentation will share concepts to utilize with the codes of ethics as we strive to truly deliver the highest quality of care!

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1. Identify the 3 main points to consider when faced with potential ethical dilemmas.

 

2. Identify a statement from the ASHA Code of Ethics relevant in navigating at least 3 ethical scenarios encountered by SLPs.

 

3. Identify a key concept to utilize in navigating ethical situations, consistent with our charge to deliver the highest quality of care.

 

4. Compare and contrast a basically ethical response with a higher quality level of response in at least one ethical case scenario.

Biography: 

This presenter has been a field clinician for 20+ years. She has worked in a variety of settings and with a number of different populations, including autism spectrum disorder. She has served as an interdisciplinary evaluator/consultant and speech-language pathology supervisor, as well. During her work, she has seen and consulted with many clinicians (and educators/caregivers) who struggle in working with clients with challenging behaviors (with varying degrees of openness). Working alongside other disciplines in treating an array of function/behavior levels, she has had the opportunity to observe many different strategies and learn how to apply them to specific client situations. There are some practical, cost-effective, tools, strategies, and tips, which can often go a long way in assisting clinicians in gaining control of challenging situations to build positive relationships with clients and result in progress in speech/language function. The rationale behind why and how to use these tools/strategies will be shared, so participants have a better understanding of the related foundational concepts and are better prepared to apply them appropriately to a variety of situations spanning a range of complexity. Additionally, the actual tools/strategies themselves will be shared, with application to client case examples.

Disclosures:

Jennifer Buhrmann, Joyful Noises and UT Health San Antonio

Disclosure:

Financial– Consulting fee, Intellectual property rights, Speaking fee, Royalty, Honoraria, Ownership interest (e.g. stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest excluding diversified mutual funds)

Employment, Teaching and speaking, Ownership, Consulting, Independent contractor (including contracted research)

Nonfinancial- Although this presentation is not designed to focus on Jennifer’s published materials, it should be noted that she believes in the value of multi-modal types of learning opportunities (visual, auditory, kinesthetic), such as music (when used appropriately by relevant personnel), in working with individuals with special needs.   She is an educator of graduate speech-language pathology students with UT Health-San Antonio.

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 1:30-2:30

Title: 

Three Keys to Effective AAC Implementation: Knowledge, Novelty and Leadership

Author:

Kym Heine, MS, CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

This presentation will provide suggestions on how communication partners can learn the language/vocabulary represented in a client’s speech generating device (SGD). Numerous strategies and tools will be shared to address various learning styles. Participants will engage in a discussion regarding the use of novel therapy materials. A list of suggested materials will be provided. Ideas on how to collaborate with co-workers to obtain and organize therapy materials will be presented. Participants will take a Partner Augmented Input Self-Assessment to identify strengths and weaknesses as they pertain to modeling on the client’s AAC system, eliciting the spontaneous use of that system, and respecting all forms of the client’s communication.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1. Describe three ways to learn the language/vocabulary in an SGD

 

2. Develop a system for using novel therapy materials

 

3. Apply three principles of following the child’s lead and modeling the client's AAC system

Biography: 

Kym Heine M. S. CCC-SLP AAC Specialist for PRC-Saltillo Kym earned her B. A. in Speech Language Pathology at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, and completed her master’s degree in Communication Disorders at Pennsylvania State University. Kym has been employed in a variety of settings to include rehabilitation centers, hospitals, and outpatient clinics. In her current role as AAC Specialist for PRC-Saltillo she spends most of her time training individuals how to implement the use of communication devices at home and school.

Disclosures:

Kym Heine M.S., CCC-SLP - PRC-Saltillo         

Financial – Salary, Ownership interest (e.g., stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest excluding diversified mutual funds)

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 1:30-2:30

Title: 

False and Exaggerated Hearing Loss: Patient Characteristics and Management

Author:

James Peck, Ph.D.

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

This paper discusses characteristics and management of false and exaggerated hearing loss, FEHL. A companion paper is about terminology used in regard to FEHL. Attending one session is not dependent on attending the other.

Psychosocial problems are common in cases of false and exaggerated hearing loss, and audiologists can screen for them. This talk does not discuss testing. The first part of this paper will discuss demographics, factors and signs of psychosocial disorders, supposed causes of childhood FEHL, and common psychological problems of children and youth. The second part will demonstrate techniques for interviewing-screening-counseling-referring for psychosocial problems in persons who present FEHL.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Name psychosocial conditions and situations relevant to FEHL.

 

2.    Give the approximate age distribution and gender proportion of persons exhibiting FEHL in the general population.

 

3.    Describe four different techniques or tactics in screening-counseling-referring in regard to psychosocial problems.

Biography: 

James E. Peck, Ph.D. associate professor emeritus University of Mississippi Medical Center. Dr. Peck obtained his doctorate in audiology from Vanderbilt University. He spent his career as a clinician-teacher. His major interest is false and exaggerated hearing loss, about which he has given state and national presentations. His book, Pseudohypacusis: False and Exaggerated Hearing Loss, is the only book on the topic. He is also the author of the chapter on pseudohypacusis in the Comprehensive Handbook of Pediatric Audiology.

Disclosures:

James Peck, Ph.D.

Financial – Royalties from book publishing

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 2:30-4:30

Title: 

Navigate Tough Talks: Communicate with Care - How to Address the Elephant in the Room

Author:

Amy Lerman, MA, CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Varied

Time: 

2 hours

Abstract: 

We have all been in a parent meeting that involved hard to hear news. Either we avoid the uncomfortable conversation, make mistakes in the delivery, or conduct a thoughtful and empathetic dialogue. Amy will provide participants with tools to navigate tough talks with first-hand accounts, research, and clinical experience.

 

This presentation will pull together three separate first-hand accounts of parents and their stories. One mother shared that, "I wanted anything and everything to be the solution." At the end of our conversation, this mother thanked me for taking the time to do a talk of this nature. She said, “This is such an important conversation. Mainstream teachers and therapists need more tools for delivering this kind of information.” In conversations with parents about communication development it can be easy to go into information delivery mode. We may think that we have sent parents away with an understanding of their child's development and then find out later that there was a breakdown in our own communication.

 

The goal of this discussion is to raise awareness about the parents’ perspective, refamiliarize with professional ethics, and to become equipped with positive communication strategies to meet these families where they are, as we engage them in tough talks.

 

Crucial Conversations occur when there is a discussion that takes place between two or more people. In these conversations, the stakes are high, opinions may vary, and emotions run high. We may believe that because we have come to the meeting with ARD paperwork, we are "prepared" for conversations with parents. However, it is imperative to discern that we are speaking about their child which tends to up the likelihood that we are entering into a crucial conversation – at least from a parent perspective. Participants will be invited to recall a time that a teacher pulled them aside, called, or spoke to them in a conference about their own child. A live and interactive discussion will follow about those interactions and their impact. The audience will be called upon to identify physiological changes (bodily sensations), inner thoughts, inner feelings, and corresponding outward behaviors they exhibited in response.

 

The ASHA Code of Ethics harkens all speech language pathologists to serve others at the highest level of professionalism and competence. Together, attendees will take a closer look at principles and rules that support the need to facilitate and navigate tough talks with parents. For example, in the first principle of Ethics, Rule M, we are reminded of our "responsibility to hold paramount the welfare of persons they serve professionally." In the event that a therapist was to avoid sharing difficult to hear news, that would not be upholding the welfare of the family or helping them develop a care plan for their child. We have a delicate opportunity to share news and engage our active listening without personal bias or judgement of their response. Rather, through this thoughtful pause, there is time to develop a healthy curiosity about the families’ thoughts, feelings, and reaction to new and difficult news. The evidence-based triangle is a positive reminder as we strive to strike that therapeutic balance between family values, clinical expertise, and research. Participants will have an opportunity to refamiliarize with the second principle of ethics and our "responsibility to achieve and maintain the highest level of professional competence and performance." A speech language pathologist's highest professional responsibility includes instances where we are called upon to communicate hard to hear news (in a method that honors the listener). We have a responsibility to lean into the discomfort on behalf of the child and the family. It is kind and professional to help a family help their child gain access to their full potential.

 

While it is both kind and professional to communicate hard to hear news, it is also something that takes thought and preparation. Therefore, participants will identify nonverbal and verbal positive strategies available to help us competently and compassionately become prepared for tough talks with parents. Time is an instrumental aspect when we plant seeds of information prior to the larger conversation. There are ways to curate our words when describing the struggle of a child on a particular day especially when we begin with and then end with a positive observation from that same day. A choice to engage in active listening can greatly increase the potential for mutual understanding. This intentional technique involves careful listening, observation, and responsive feedback in order to help defuse situations and seek solutions to problems. Body positioning, facial affect, pause, and environment add a supportive element when used effectively. Clarity, honesty, and respect are verbal tools that will illuminate what we see, the truth, and with composure so that we are best equipped to listen to their response or reaction which will likely be emotional. Consistency in delivery is imperative to keep the therapist from backing up on what was reflected to the family especially when they are flooded with emotion and hoping for a different message. The final recommendation is that speech language pathologists be up front about what they do not know. Words such as “never,” “always” and “definitely” can be especially tricky during this dialogue. Once again, this is a great opportunity to utilize anecdotal information.

 

When a speech language pathologist attends a parent meeting that will ultimately entail "hard to hear information," one puts forth clinical expertise, necessary paperwork (the research), and demonstrate compassion to the family and their needs. By achieving this professional balance, we will communicate with care so that parents feel our support. After all, what is heard, thought, and felt, impacts parents' ability to make sound decisions on behalf of their child. Families need us now more than ever. Let us work together to bring the knowledge and strength we have gathered in our practice (and throughout the last years in particular), into tough talks through active listening, and sharing difficult news with wisdom and compassion.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Analyze a variety of parent perspectives as they relate to identification of language and communication delays/disorders in their children.

 

2.    Connect how nonverbal language and time are integral tools in delivering hard to hear news to parents/caregivers

 

3.    Describe at least three verbal positive strategies that will help them to better navigate tough talks.

Biography: 

Amy Lerman is a certified SLP, obtaining her undergraduate degree from UT Austin and master’s degree from George Washington University in DC. Amy has primarily worked in pediatric school-based settings providing group therapy. In her new role of outreach, she presents at conferences, conventions, and schools. Amy's passion is to help early learners grow and connect. Amy lives with her husband Marshall (Pediatrician) and daughters Lyla (14) and Sunny (9) in Houston, Texas.

Disclosures:

Amy Lerman, MA, CCC-SLP - The Parish School        

Financial – Honoraria from MSHA; Salaried employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 2:30-3:30

Title: 

Craniofacial Anomalies and Feeding

Author:

Jenna Nassar, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

Craniofacial anomalies can greatly impact the development of feeding skills which further influences growth and development. These same anomalies not only affect intake but also the continue development of the orofacial complex. This lecture will dive into the various types of craniofacial anomalies often seen at birth and look at the impact on feeding skills with a strong focus on management of feeding development from birth to 3 years.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

  1. Identify 4 types of facial clefts

 

  1. Identify the embryonic stage where cleft palate development begins.

 

  1. Name 3 common bottle systems utilized during feeding.

Biography: 

My name is Jenna Nassar and I am a pediatric speech pathologist and an instructor in the Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. In addition to these roles, I am also the Clinical internship coordinator for the department of Speech Pathology. I specialize in pediatric swallow & feeding disorders and am trained in various approaches including the SOS approach to feeding, Vital Stim, myofascial release, and oromyofunctional therapy. I hold Board Certification in swallow and swallowing disorders. I am a member of the American Speech Language and Hearing Association, the Mississippi Speech Language and Hearing Association, and SIG 13. My background includes several years of working with swallowing disorders in trach & ventilator patients and now pediatric feeding disorders. I graduated summa cum laude in 2007 from Mississippi University for Women with a BS in speech and hearing science and then graduated in 2009 with high distinction with an MS in Communicative Sciences from Jackson State University. I enjoy the academia related to our profession and have served as an adjunct professor with Jackson State University as well as a student intern supervisor for various programs. I am employed by Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences at the University of Mississippi Medical Center where I receive a salary and have nothing else to disclose financially at this time. Non-financial disclosure: MSHA Vice President of Continuing Education

 

Disclosures:

Jenna Nassar, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S    

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - VP of Education for MSHA; Board membership

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 3:00-4:30

Title: 

Reaching New Heights in Data:  Data-Driven Caseload Management and Dismissals

Author:

Rachel Powell, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-CL

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1.5 Hours

Abstract: 

High caseload size is the second largest complaint by SLPs in schools (ASHA, 2020). This session will present data-driven decision making for the purposes of caseload management and dismissal. Learners will define the eligibility criteria for a disability under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 2004), including adverse impact and the need for specific, specialized instructional support. Data collection methods discussed will include curriculum-based assessments aligned to the Mississippi College and Career Ready Standards. The Sampling Utterance and Grammatical Analysis (SUGAR, Pavelko & Owens, 2017) language sample analysis method will be presented as a method to support the need for students to receive or be dismissed from language therapy.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Define the eligibility criteria under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, including adverse impact and the need for specific, specialized instruction.

 

2.    Describe curriculum-based language assessment measures tied to the grade-level standards that can be utilized for dismissal.

 

3.    Analyze a language sample using the Sampling Utterance and Grammatical Analysis Revised (SUGAR, Pavelko & Owens, 2017) and apply it to the need for specialized instructional support.

Biography: 

Rachel Powell, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL, is a speech-language pathologist and literacy lead teacher for Brookhaven School District. She specializes in language development and disorders, and literacy acquisition and disorders. She has worked in schools for 20 years and received the 2021 ASHFoundation Rolland Van Hattum Award for Contributions in Schools.

Disclosures:

Rachel Powell, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-CL- Brookhaven School District      

Financial – Salary; Employment

Nonfinancial - ASHA & MSHA Membership; MSHA Legislative Chair; ASHA Scientific and Professional Education Board membership, Volunteer membership on advisory committee or review panels

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 3:00-5:00

Praxis Bowl

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 3:30-5:00

Title: 

Language, Literacy, and the SLP

Author:

Angie Neal

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1.5 Hours

Abstract: 

Language, Literacy, and the SLP will explore the evidence base behind the SLPs unique knowledge base and contributions towards improving literacy outcomes. The focus will be on the only scientifically supported developmental reading model (Savage, 2021) known as The Simple View of Reading (Gough & Tunmer, 1986) as well as Scarborough’s Reading Rope (Scarborough, 2018) in addition to practical applications within direct therapy as well as collaboration.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Discuss The Simple View of Reading and its connection to language

 

2.    List critical aspects of Scarborough’s Reading Rope that are specific to language

 

3.    Prepare effective therapy activities that promote improvement of literacy outcomes

Biography: 

Angie Neal is the SLP Contact at the South Carolina State Department of Education, a member of ASHA's School Issues Advisory Board, graduate of ASHA’s School-Based Leadership Development Program, and a board member with the State Education Agency Communication Disabilities Council. She is also the recipient of the Nancy McKinley Leadership Award (Ohio) and the Rolland J. Van Hattum Award (South Carolina). She has worked in adult rehabilitation, pediatric outpatient rehabilitation, and school settings, but her passion is helping children achieve academic success! Mrs. Neal is also a frequent presenter on a variety of speech-language pathology topics such as cultural and linguistic diversity, language and literacy, remediation of /r/, and pragmatics. She is a true nerd and enthusiast for all things SLP!

Disclosures:

Angie Neal, M.S. CCC-SLP

Financial – The presenter received an honorarium for presenting this course. Supplemental handouts may be found on TeachersPayTeachers, Angie Neal, pirateslp. Intellectual property rights, speaking fee; Teaching and Speaking

Nonfinancial – The presenter is a member of the ASHA School-Issues Advisory Board, State Education Agency Communication Disabilities Council and employed by the South Carolina Department of Education. Board member.

 

Thursday, September 22, 2022, 4:00-5:00

Title: 

Supervision:  A to Gen Z

Author:

Kimberly Ward, Au. D., CCC-A, CH-AP and Amy Lebert, Ed. D. CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

Clinical supervision as a professional practice permeates current society. It is an integral and pivotal part of the initial training of audiologists and speech-language pathologists. Furthermore, clinical supervision is a required component of certification and increased accountability within clinical programs highlights why further research is warranted. Furthermore, clinical supervisors need consistent data regarding graduate student clinicians’ critical perspectives of supervision. Research reviews indicated disconnection between the clinical supervisor and graduate clinicians. This creates many obstacles to the role and relationship between supervisor and student and the road to independent high-quality clinical skills. Graduate student clinicians should feel comfortable discussing their needs with supervisors. We will discuss the changing roles of clinical supervisors and graduate clinicians. Lastly, we will determine the best practice relating to supervising generation z clinicians.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.      Describe a successful clinical supervisor and graduate student clinician relationship

 

2.      List 3 roles of a clinical supervisor and graduate student clinician

 

3.     Identify key components of clinical supervision in 2022

Biography: 

Dr. Amy LeBert serves as the SLP Clinic Coordinator and Assistant Teaching Professor at USM. She teaches several undergraduate courses and supervises graduate student clinicians during their on-campus clinical practicum. She serves on numerous college-level committees and currently chairs the graduate admissions committee. Additionally, she is involved with a myriad of professional activities including the Council of Academic Accreditation Site Visitor, Council of Speech-Language-Hearing Association Presidents-Past President, and Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association 2018 President and 2021 Conference Chair. She received the 2020 Honors of the Association, Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Lastly, she has presented at the state and national level during the last five years.

Disclosures:

Amy LeBert, Ed. D. CCC-SLP - The University of Southern Mississippi      

Financial – Salary; Employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Kimberly Ward, Au. D., CCC-A, CH-AP - The University of Southern Mississippi   

Financial – Salary; Employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 7:30 am

Registration Packet Pick-up Begins

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 8:00-10:00

Title: 

Why is R So Hard?

Author:

Angie Neal

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

Therapy for /R/ can be one of the most difficult and challenging for SLPs. This presentation will provide SLPs with a solid understanding of why /r/ is such a complex phoneme and how to achieve success. This presentation does not focus on the use of any specific tools or programs but is presented by someone wildly enthusiastic about teaching /r/!

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

4.    Discuss updated developmental norms for acquisition of /r/"

 

5.    List critical factors to consider relative to the eligibility in the school setting

 

6.    Prepare effective therapy activities that promote or eliminate the need for generalization"

Biography: 

Angie Neal is the SLP Contact at the South Carolina State Department of Education, a member of ASHA's School Issues Advisory Board, graduate of ASHA’s School-Based Leadership Development Program, and a board member with the State Education Agency Communication Disabilities Council. She is also the recipient of the Nancy McKinley Leadership Award (Ohio) and the Rolland J. Van Hattum Award (South Carolina). She has worked in adult rehabilitation, pediatric outpatient rehabilitation, and school settings, but her passion is helping children achieve academic success! Mrs. Neal is also a frequent presenter on a variety of speech-language pathology topics such as cultural and linguistic diversity, language and literacy, remediation of /r/, and pragmatics. She is a true nerd and enthusiast for all things SLP!

Disclosures:

Angie Neal, M.S. CCC-SLP

Financial – The presenter received an honorarium for presenting this course. Supplemental handouts may be found on TeachersPayTeachers, Angie Neal, pirateslp. Intellectual property rights, Speaking fee; Teaching and Speaking

Nonfinancial – The presenter is a member of the ASHA School-Issues Advisory Board, State Education Agency Communication Disabilities Council and employed by the South Carolina Department of Education.Board member.

 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 8:00-9:00

Title: 

Do I Really Want to be a Teletherapist?: Navigating the World of Teletherapy for Those Considering Making the Switch

Author:

Carole Bass, M.S., CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1 hour

Abstract: 

While many became teletherapists out of necessity when the pandemic hit, many have embraced this platform and moved to full-time teletherapy. With the stresses of balancing work and home life weighing heavily on many SLPs, teletherapy is changing the way many therapists approach their jobs. From how to find the right employer to conducting online evaluations to the what types of therapy materials to use, this session provides an overview of how you can get started as a teletherapist.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

7.    Describe how to ensure that you are providing services legally via teletherapy to clients in another state.

 

8.    Name at least 3 questions to ask a potential teletherapy employer about the position you are seeking.

 

9.    Describe at least two types of therapy materials that can be used on almost any teletherapy platform.

Biography: 

Carole Bass earned a Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Southern Mississippi and holds the ASHA Certificate of Clinical Competence. She is a four time recipient of ASHA's ACE award for continuing education and holds LSVT LOUD® certification. Being an SLP for 25 years, she has worked primarily in the schools, but has also worked in outpatient clinics, hospitals, nursing homes, and home health. Since January 2021, she has been providing services exclusively via teletherapy to students ages 3 through 14 across the United States. In addition to providing services, she creates materials for teletherapists and serves as a sales consultant for Smarty Ears and Smarty Symbols.

Disclosures:

Carole Bass M.S., CCC-SLP, Smarty Ears/Smarty Symbols and The Speech Magnolia

Financial - Ownership, Independent contractor (including contracted research); I serve as a sales consultant for Smarty Ears/Smarty Symbols, which is an independent contractor position. I also own The Speech Magnolia where I create and sell materials on TPT and Boom Learning.

Nonfinancial- ASHA SIG 18 Member

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 8:00-9:30

Title: 

Building Your Case for Medical Necessity:  The Nuts and Bolts of Skilled Therapy Documentation

Author:

Melissa Collier, M.S. CCC-SLP, CHC, CDP

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1.5 Hours

Abstract: 

This course will provide participants with an understanding of documentation and billing requirements in a post-acute setting, including Medicare regulations and guidelines. SLPs will learn to identify why speech therapy services are denied, ways to mitigate the denial of skilled services, and how to document medical necessity. An overview of billing and coding will also be provided.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Identify 3 reasons SLP services are denied by payers in a post-acute setting.

 

2.    Describe documentation requirements to support the provision of medically necessary services.

 

3.    Document skilled therapy services that supports medical necessity and is in with Medicare requirements for reimbursement.

Biography: 

Melissa Collier received her Master's degree in Speech-Language Pathology from Texas Christian University and actively holds a Certification in Healthcare Compliance. She has extensive clinical experience in post-acute care, having worked in skilled nursing and home health settings for the last 14 years. Melissa is a subject matter expert in post-acute care reimbursement, denials and appeals, and documentation compliance.

 

Melissa currently serves as the Vice President of Clinical Quality and Compliance for Continuum Rehab Group where she provides clinical education, develops and implements clinical programming, and oversees CRG's denials and appeals department and compliance program. She has previously written and presented continuing education courses in the areas of documentation, dysphagia, healthcare compliance, and dementia for the Texas Speech-Language and Hearing Association, ASHA, and other online continuing education platforms.

Disclosures:

Melissa Collier, M.S. CCC-SLP, CHC, CDP - Continuum Rehab Group      

Financial – Honoraria from MSHA; Salaried employment, teaching and speaking from Continuum Rehab Group

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 8:00-10:00

Title: 

Advances in Cochlear Implantation:  New Indications and Individualized Mapping

Author:

Margaret Dillon, Au.D., Ph.D.

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

The indications for cochlear implantation have expanded to include children and adults with severe-to-profound hearing in one ear and normal to near-normal hearing in the contralateral ear, known as unilateral hearing loss (UHL) or single-sided deafness (SSD). Cochlear implant users with UHL/SSD experience significant improvements on measures of speech recognition in challenging maskers, sound source localization, tinnitus severity, and subjective benefit. Part 1 of this presentation will review outcomes of CI use for patients with UHL/SSD and discuss the variables that may contribute to the early, significant benefits. Findings from clinical trials with CI users with UHL/SSD and preliminary data from ongoing studies motivated the use of imaging to individualize the map settings for patients listening with CI and electric-acoustic stimulation devices. Part 2 of this presentation will review an preliminary evidence from ongoing studies on the effectiveness of using imaging to individualize the map settings for patients with UHL/SSD.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    The learner will list the limitations of listeners with UHL/SSD experience as compared to listeners with bilateral normal hearing.

 

2.    The learner will describe the reported benefit of cochlear implant use for recipients with UHL/SSD.

 

3.    The learner will define the potential benefits of individualizing the map settings to reduce frequency-to-place mismatch for cochlear implant and electric-acoustic stimulation device users.

Biography: 

Margaret Dillon, AuD, PhD is an Associate Professor and Director of Cochlear Implant Clinical Research in the Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dr. Dillon conducts research investigating new indications for cochlear implantation and individualized mapping techniques for children and adults listening with cochlear implants and electric-acoustic stimulation devices.

Disclosures:

Margaret Dillon, AuD, Ph.D. – NIH NIDCD and MED-EL Corporation

Financial – Honoraria from MSHA; grants

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 9:30-11:30

Title: 

Helping our Patients Through Thick or Thin (Liquids) – Part One

Author:

Hillary Cooper, M.A., CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

Thickeners are pervasively used in dysphagia management and have historically been taught to be benign one-size-fits-all solutions for aspiration. However, current research shows that thickeners may be contraindicated in some circumstances and harmful in others. In this lecture, we discuss the evidence behind the use of thickeners as dysphagia compensation techniques as well as the pros, cons, and ingredients of the most commonly used thickeners on the market.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    The participant will identify 3 aspects of thickening which may impact quality of life

2.    The participant will demonstrate understanding of the current scientific evidence regarding use of thickeners without instrumentation.

3.    The participant will describe 5 types of thickeners and their primary indications and contraindications for use.

 

 

 

 

Biography: 

Hillary got her start in speech-language pathology in an outpatient private practice in Leesville, Louisiana, which served active-duty soldiers, their dependents, and military retirees.  The wide range of experience she gained in that position served her well when she moved to Ruston to marry her soulmate.  She has since worked in long term care facilities, acute care, and home health.  In 2016, Hillary decided that she wanted to set out to change the status quo of dysphagia treatment in North Louisiana, so she started her own outpatient private practice and then created North Louisiana Swallow Solutions to be the premier mobile FEES provider in the region.  Because of her need for an artistic outlet, Hillary created an online gift shop called SLPstuff.com, which donated a portion of every sale to speech-language pathology related charitable organizations.  And because of her strong need to give back to a world that has given her so much, Hillary co-founded The Dysphagia Outreach Project, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide meaningful assistance to individuals affected by dysphagia.  In 2020 Hillary joined forces with Jessica Lasky and Michael Kurtz to establish Evolutionary Education Solutions, an ASHA approved CEU Provider to bring high quality dysphagia education to speech-language pathologists around the country.  In her free time, Hillary enjoys teaching and travels around the country providing high-quality lectures to medical speech-language pathologists. A chronic overachiever, Hillary has earned multiple ASHA Ace awards for going above and beyond the standard requirements for continuing education.  She is also in the process of earning her Board Certification in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (BCS-S).

Disclosures:

Hillary Cooper, M.A., CCC-SLP - North Louisiana Swallow Solutions, Evolutionary Education Solutions, Medical SLP Collective, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Mississippi Speech-Language Hearing Association  

Financial - Salary, Consulting fee, Intellectual property rights, Speaking fee, Honoraria, Ownership interest (e.g. stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest excluding diversified mutual funds) Convention Registration and Housing; Teaching and speaking, Ownership

Nonfinancial - Dysphagia Outreach Project, Louisiana Speech-Language Hearing Association, ASHA; President of DOP, President of LSHA, Member of 2022 Convention planning committee; Board membership, Volunteer membership on advisory committee or review panels

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 9:30-11:30

Title: 

Screen Time Considerations for Children:  Concerns and Engagements

Author:

Carol Westby, PhD, CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

Research conducted recently has reported that during the covid-19 pandemic, children and adolescents spent significantly more time on screens. Much of the increased screen time as a result of covid-19 was not related to increased educational activities, but, rather, increased video watching and game playing. Although screen time can be beneficial, research shows that large amounts of screen time can negativity impact children’s brain, language, and social-emotional development; self-regulation; and a host of other issues and behaviors. When selecting and using screen media appropriately and effectively, speech-language pathologists need to consider three factors: the age, characteristics, and interests of the child; whether the child will be using the media independently or will be co-viewing the media with a supportive adult; and the content of the media, that is, does the media engage the child in meaningful, active ways? Are themes/topics appropriate? Is it relevant to the child’s real life?

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Describe benefits and risks of screen time

 

2.    Describe considerations in selecting appropriate media materials:  the child, the context, and the content

 

3.    Describe strategies for managing screen time

Biography: 

Dr. Carol Westby, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a consultant for Bilingual Multicultural Services in Albuquerque, NM and holds an affiliated appointment in Communication Disorders at Brigham Young University in Provo, UT. She is a fellow of the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), has received the Honors of ASHA and the Kleffner Lifetime Clinical Achievement Award, and holds Board Certification in Child Language and Language Disorders. Dr. Westby has received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from Geneva College and the University of Iowa's Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and the ASHA Award for Contributions to Multicultural Affairs. She is widely recognized for her development of the Westby Playscale, an assessment tool for young children. She had published and presented nationally and internationally on a wide variety of topics including screen time and learning in the 21st century, assessing and facilitating play in children, theory of mind, narrative development, adverse childhood experiences, and issues in assessment and intervention with culturally/linguistically diverse populations. Dr. Westby has a BA in English from Geneva College and an MA and PhD in Speech Pathology from the University of Iowa.

Disclosures:

Carol Westby, PhD, CCC-SLP

Financial Disclosures

• Receives an honorarium and travel expenses from the Mississippi Speech, Language, Hearing Association for this presentation

• Supervises first year speech-language pathologists for Bilingual Multicultural Services, Albuquerque, NM USA 

• Receives an honorarium for producing Word of Mouth, a newsletter for school speech-language pathologists for Pro-Ed

Nonfinancial Disclosures

• Is a member of the American Board of Child Language/Language Disorders

• Is a consultant to the Global Tales project of the IALP Child Language Committee

• Is a member of the IALP Autism Committee 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 10:00-11:30

Title: 

Treating the child with Oromyofunctional Deficits

Author:

Jenna Nassar MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S and Krissy Beattie

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1.5 hours

Abstract: 

Oromyofunctional disorders are common among children with medically complex histories as well as those that are felt to be typically developing. This is a trending topic currently in the speech pathology world. This lecture will delve into treatment of OMDs with a focus on how to approach treatment from infancy to school age children.

Learning Objectives:

Following this session, attendees will be able to:

 

  1. The attendee will be able to define Oromyofunctional disorder

 

  1. The attendee will be able to state the appropriate age to start an oromyofunctional treatment plan.

 

  1. The attendee will be able to identify the hierarchy of treatment.

Biography: 

My name is Jenna Nassar and I am a pediatric speech pathologist and an instructor in the Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. In addition to these roles, I am also the Clinical internship coordinator for the department of Speech Pathology. I specializes in pediatric swallow & feeding disorders and am trained in various approaches including the SOS approach to feeding, Vital Stim, myofascial release, and oromyofunctional therapy. I hold Board Certification in swallow and swallowing disorders. I am a member of the American Speech Language and Hearing Association, the Mississippi Speech Language and Hearing Association, and SIG 13. My background includes several years of working with swallowing disorders in trach & ventilator patients and now pediatric feeding disorders. I graduated summa cum laude in 2007 from Mississippi University for Women with a BS in speech and hearing science and then graduated in 2009 with high distinction with an MS in Communicative Sciences from Jackson State University. I enjoy the academia related to our profession and have served as an adjunct professor with Jackson State University as well as a student intern supervisor for various programs. I am employed by Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences at the University of Mississippi Medical Center where I receive a salary and have nothing else to disclose financially at this time. Non-financial disclosure: MSHA Vice President of Continuing Education.

Disclosures:

Jenna Nassar, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S    

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - VP of Education for MSHA; Board membership

Krissy Beattie, MS, CCC-SLP

Financial- No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial- No relevant non-financial relationship exists.

 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 10:00-11:30

Title: 

Cochlear Implants:  Factors Affecting Outcomes and Recent Advances in Research

Author:

Soha Garadat, Ph.D.

Instructional Level: 

Advanced

Time: 

1.5 Hours

Abstract: 

Cochlear implantation has become widely accepted as an effective medical intervention of deafness in individuals with severe to profound hearing loss who attain minimal benefits from amplification. According to NIDCH, as of December 2019, approximately 736,900 registered devices have been implanted worldwide. This number continues to increase due to the expanding cochlear implant candidacy criteria to include infants as young as nine months, patients with single unilateral deafness, and those with more residual hearing. 

In general, significant remarkable advancement in the design and function of cochlear implants has been made which facilitated and led to the reported successful implantation outcome. However, the success of cochlear implantation depends on several factors. In order to counsel patients more effectively, it is important for clinical audiologists to be aware of some of the factors that could impact overall performance. Therefore, this paper will discuss important topics in cochlear implantation including importance of early intervention, auditory training, current limitations in cochlear implant technology, as well as recent research trends and innovations in cochlear implant.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Identify several factors that may impact expected performance outcomes for individuals with cochlear implants

 

2.    Demonstrate knowledge of most recent advancements in cochlear implant research.

 

3.    Demonstrate knowledge of benefits and limitation of cochlear implant

Biography: 

Dr. Garadat joined the faculty of University of Southern Mississippi in January 2022. She received her M.S. and PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Garadat completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. Her research interests are primarily focused on understanding some of the factors that might affect variability in cochlear implant recipients and improving implant outcome.

Disclosures:

Soha Garadat, Ph.D. – The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – Salary; employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

Friday, September 23, 2022, 1:30-3:30

Title: 

Enhancing Your Cultural Competence to be a Better Service Provider and Professional

Author:

Kia Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

Audiologists and speech-language pathologists work with culturally diverse populations, but are often unprepared to deliver culturally competent care in clinical settings. Moreover, the importance and need to exercise cultural competence in professional relationships with culturally diverse colleagues is often an afterthought. Therefore, this session will provide an overview of concepts related to diversity, equity, and inclusion as well as strategies on how to enhance ones’ cultural competence in both clinical and professional settings. 

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Explain the difference between cultural competence and cultural humility.

 

2.    Identify challenges and opportunities in service delivery to culturally diverse populations.

 

3.    Describe ways to implement culturally responsive practices that can be applied in clinical settings and professional interactions.

Biography: 

Kia Noelle Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP is the Associate Director of the Arthur M. Blank Center for Stuttering Education and Research Satellite in Atlanta, Georgia through the University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Johnson specializes in developmental stuttering with a focus on culturally diverse populations. She is also a growing leader in providing workshops and presentations on topics related to diversity, equity, and inclusion in clinical and professional settings.  She has contributed service to the profession through several volunteer roles and has mentored countless undergraduate and graduate students within the profession. She serves as Chair of the Board of Directors for the National Black Association for Speech-Language and Hearing, is a member of Board of Directors for the ASHA, and also serves as the National Advisor to the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association. 

Disclosures:

Kia Johnson, Ph.D., CCC-SLP     

Financial – Honoraria from MSHA; Teaching and speaking

Nonfinancial – ASHA; NBASLH; National NSSLHA; Member of the Board of Directors (ASHA & NBASLH); National Advisor (NSSLHA); Board membership

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 1:30-2:30

 

Title: 

MDE Update

Author:

Teresa Laney

Instructional Level: 

Varied

Time: 

1.0 Hour

Abstract: 

The MDE Office of Special Education supports school-based Speech-Language Pathologists, Speech Associates, and other related service providers by providing resources and guidance on both compliance requirements and best practice. This session will bring updates on the latest hot topics including, but not limited to, year-round IEPs and the early childhood COS process.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Identify compliance issues that may have a negative effect on student outcomes.

 

2.    Understand the benefits and pitfalls of year-round IEPs.

 

3.    Identify the components of and resources relative to the COS preschool assessment process.

Biography: 

Teresa Laney, M.S., CCC-SLP, is the Speech/Language and Related Services Consultant for the Mississippi Department of Education. In this capacity, she provides professional development and coaching to school-based speech-language pathologists and teachers for the Office of Special Education. She is certified in dyslexia assessment and has nine years of experience tutoring children with dyslexia.

Disclosures:

Teresa Laney M.S., CCC-SLP – Mississippi Department of Education

Financial – Salary; Employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists


Friday, September 23, 2022, 1:30-2:30

Title: 

Why Does He Act Like That?  Understanding Behaviors and Why They Occur

Author:

Hannah Sanders

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1.0 Hour

Abstract: 

Behavioral challenges occur across all populations, but are particularly prevalent in children on the autism spectrum. Being proactive and understanding the functions of a child's behavior can make your job much easier than reacting following a behavioral episode. Practical applications for reducing behaviors will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Identify the 4 functions of behavior.

 

2.    Identify 4 ways to give more effective instructions.

 

3.    List 3 structured tasks that can target IEP goals and are proactive for reducing negative behaviors.

Biography: 

Speech Language Pathologist and Student Practicum Coordinator

The Children's Center for Communication and Development at The University of Southern Mississippi

Hannah is a speech-language pathologist at The Children's Center for Communication and Development at The University of Southern Mississippi where she provides services to children ages birth-5 and parent training in both their natural environments and within the Center. Hannah also serves as The Children's Center's practicum coordinator for graduate students, undergraduate students, and student volunteers.

Disclosures:

Hannah Sanders, MS, CCC-SLP -  The Children's Center for Communication and Development at The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – Salary; Employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 1:30-2:30

Title: 

Auditory Evoked Response Related Research

Author:

Sally Autry, Tyler Weaver, Sangamanatha Ankmnal Veeranna, Soha Garadat, Charles G Marx,  Patricia LeeAnn Youngblood, Lucy Bradshaw, Mildred Threadgill 

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1.0 Hour

Abstract: 

Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials (CAEP) can be utilized as an objective measure of behavioral threshold estimation. However, more data is needed to support the clinical application of CAEP for predicting hearing thresholds. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between behavioral and CAEP thresholds using a clinically feasible protocol.  Twenty-seven adult participants (ages 20-82 years) including normal hearing and those with sensorineural hearing loss were recruited. Behavioral and CAEP pure tone thresholds were obtained at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz from all participants. Only one ear was tested. Time taken to determine the CAEP threshold for each frequency was noted. Approximately 10 min was required to establish a threshold for each test frequency. There was a significant positive association between the behavioral and CAEP threshold. On average, behavioral pure tone thresholds were 10 dB lower at 500 and 1000 Hz and 15 dB lower at 2000 and 4000 Hz compared to the CAEP threshold. CAEPs can be used to reliably estimate behavioral thresholds in a reasonable amount of time. 10-15 dB differences between behavioral and cortical thresholds agreed with the published literature findings.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Describe Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials.

 

2.    Estimate hearing thresholds using Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials

 

3.    Describe between Cortical Auditory Evoked Potential threshold and behavioral pure tone threshold

Biography: 

Sally Autry is a third-year audiology student at the University of Southern Mississippi. She received her Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Mississippi in 2020. Her interests are diagnostic audiology and electrophysiological testing.

 

My name is Tyler Weaver. I am a second year Doctor of Audiology student at The University of Southern Mississippi. I am a Graduate Assistant at The Children’s Center for Communication and Development on the campus of Southern Miss. I have obtained my Bachelor of Science degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders at The University of Mississippi. I preformed research in my undergraduate program in the subjects of “Audiological Rehabilitation” and “Telepractice.

 

Sangamanatha Ankmnal Veeranna (Ph.D.) is an Assistant Professor in audiology at the University of Southern Mississippi. Completed my Ph.D. in Hearing Science from the Western University, Canada. My area of research is understanding auditory processing in individuals with and without listening difficulties using psychoacoustic and electrophysiological measurements.  

 

Dr. Garadat joined the faculty of University of Southern Mississippi in January 2022. She received her M.S. and PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Garadat completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor. Her research interests are primarily focused on understanding some of the factors that might affect variability in cochlear implant recipients and improving implant outcome.

 

Charles G. Marx, Au.D., CCC-A is an Audiologist and Associate Professor at The University of Southern Mississippi. A graduate of Mississippi State University (B.A.) and the University of Southern Mississippi (M.S., Au.D.), Dr. Marx teaches courses involving the electrophysiological assessment of hearing and balance. His primary clinical duties at the University involve the electrophysiological assessment of hearing in infants and young children and general Pediatric and Adult behavioral audiometry. Prior to working at USM, Dr. Marx served as the director of Wesley Medical Center’s Neurodiagnostics Department for 25 years.

 

Patricia "LeeAnn"" Youngblood is a third-year audiology student at the University of Southern Mississippi. She received her Bachelor of Science in Educational Psychology with a concentration in Speech-Language Pathology at Mississippi State University in 2020. Her current interests are electrophysiological testing and diagnostic audiology.

 

Lucy Bradshaw is a third-year audiology student at the University of Southern Mississippi. She received her Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Mississippi in 2019. Her interests are pediatric and educational audiology.

 

Mildred Threadgill, B.A., is a third-year doctoral candidate in the School of Speech and Hearing Sciences at the University Southern Mississippi. She received a B.A. in communicative disorders from the University of Alabama (UA). While attending UA, she served as a research assistant for Dr. Marcia Hay-McCutcheon, Au.D and co-author to “Access to Hearing Health Care, Geographical Residency, and Quality of Life in Adults With and Without Hearing Loss.” She is currently completing a clinical placement at the Children's Hospital in Covington, Louisiana. Her clinical interests include electrophysiology, diagnostics, accessibility to hearing healthcare, and hearing aids.

Disclosures:

Sally Autry– The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial -  Graduate student

 

Tyler Weaver. – The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial – Graduate student

 

Sangamanatha Ankmnal Veeranna, PhD – The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Soha Garadat, Ph.D. – The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – Salary; employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Charles G. Marx – The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – Salary; employment

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Patricia “LeeAnn” Youngblood– The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial -  Graduate student

 

Lucy Bradshaw– The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial -  Graduate student

 

Mildred Threadgill– The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial -  Graduate student

 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 1:30-3:30

Title: 

Helping Our Patients Through Thick and Thin (Liquids) – Part Two

Author:

Hillary Cooper, M.A., CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time:  

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

Thickeners are pervasively used in dysphagia management and have historically been taught to be benign one-size-fits-all solutions for aspiration. However, current research shows that thickeners may be contraindicated in some circumstances and harmful in others.  In this hand-on lab experience, the participant will be provided with a variety of commercial thickener products to mix and then perform qualitative ratings based on organoleptic properties such as mouthfeel, texture, smell, appearance, and more. Additionally, the speaker will guide the participants through a brief science experiment which will highlight the impact that salivary amylase has on thickener viscosity and stability. (DISCLOSURE/ALLERGY WARNING: Participants will be expected to consume small quantities of thickener products mixed with water during this session. Do not participate if you are highly allergic to corn, milk, galactomannans, xanthan gum, or erythritol.)

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    The participant will demonstrate correct mixing techniques for a variety of thickener products.

2.    The participant will identify the impact that salivary amylase has on the viscosity of commercial thickener products.

3.    The participant will demonstrate understanding of the importance of organoleptic properties of thickeners on quality of life and patient compliance with thickener use.

 

 

 

 

Biography: 

Hillary got her start in speech-language pathology in an outpatient private practice in Leesville, Louisiana, which served active-duty soldiers, their dependents, and military retirees.  The wide range of experience she gained in that position served her well when she moved to Ruston to marry her soulmate.  She has since worked in long term care facilities, acute care, and home health.  In 2016, Hillary decided that she wanted to set out to change the status quo of dysphagia treatment in North Louisiana, so she started her own outpatient private practice and then created North Louisiana Swallow Solutions to be the premier mobile FEES provider in the region.  Because of her need for an artistic outlet, Hillary created an online gift shop called SLPstuff.com, which donated a portion of every sale to speech-language pathology related charitable organizations.  And because of her strong need to give back to a world that has given her so much, Hillary co-founded The Dysphagia Outreach Project, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide meaningful assistance to individuals affected by dysphagia.  In 2020 Hillary joined forces with Jessica Lasky and Michael Kurtz to establish Evolutionary Education Solutions, an ASHA approved CEU Provider to bring high quality dysphagia education to speech-language pathologists around the country.  In her free time, Hillary enjoys teaching and travels around the country providing high-quality lectures to medical speech-language pathologists. A chronic overachiever, Hillary has earned multiple ASHA Ace awards for going above and beyond the standard requirements for continuing education.  She is also in the process of earning her Board Certification in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (BCS-S).

Disclosures:

Hillary Cooper, M.A., CCC-SLP - North Louisiana Swallow Solutions, Evolutionary Education Solutions, Medical SLP Collective, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Mississippi Speech-Language Hearing Association  

Financial - Salary, Consulting fee, Intellectual property rights, Speaking fee, Honoraria, Ownership interest (e.g. stocks, stock options, or other ownership interest excluding diversified mutual funds) Convention Registration and Housing; Teaching and speaking, Ownership

Nonfinancial - Dysphagia Outreach Project, Louisiana Speech-Language Hearing Association, ASHA; President of DOP, President of LSHA, Member of 2022 Convention planning committee; Board membership, Volunteer membership on advisory committee or review panels

 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 2:30-4:30

Poster Sessions

Title: 

The Positive and Negative Aspects of Telepractice in the Field of Speech Pathology

Author:

Madison Morgan, Kelly Koch

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

While The American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) deemed telepractice an appropriate method of delivery of speech language pathology services in 2005, it has become increasingly popular following the COVID-19 pandemic. With mandatory shutdowns, many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) moved their services to an online format. This thesis uses mixed methods approach to explore the aspects of telepractice, both positive and negative as it relates to speech pathology. This thesis includes three forms of data collection, the first being a literature review on current articles on the topic. The next form of data collection is an anonymous survey sent out to SLPs. Finally, volunteers were interviewed for a more personal discussion of their experiences with telepractice. Following the data collection, the analysis found that while clinicians appreciated telepractice, in-person therapy was preferred. Telepractice has many benefits: decreased cancellations, flexible scheduling, safety from illness, and no commute time. While telepractice offers many positive aspects, there is room for improvement: background knowledge on technology, internet access and failure, and decreased salaries. This research can aid individuals in making an informed decision on which therapy they may wish to partake in.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Describe variables in the decision-making process for the best method to therapy and what method benefits the individual

 

2.    Recognize the perspectives of fellow clinicians in the field on their experience with telepractice 

 

3.    Develop their own strategy for therapy based on the review of other’s experiences.

Biography: 

Madison Morgan is a senior undergraduate student at the University of Southern Mississippi. She is an Honor student conducting research on Telepractice as a part of her thesis project. 

 

Dr. Kelly Koch is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Mississippi and a licensed and certified Speech Language Pathologist. Dr. Koch has worked clinically as school-based SLP and a private practice SLP, as well as a university-based supervisor. Her research interests include Autism, childhood communication development, and communication disorders. "

Disclosures:

Kelly Koch, PhD, CCC-SLP – The University of Southern Mississippi         

Financial – Salary; Employment; Assistant professor

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Madison Morgan- The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Title: 

Speech Entrainment as Nonfluent Aphasia Therapy

Author:

Hunter Manasco Ph.D. CCC-SLP, Ashley Alexander MS CCC/SLP, Allison Topcik BS, Bailey Miller BS

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

This is a single subject study of a largely nonverbal young adult client with global aphasia who is stimulable for functional levels of expressive language using speech entrainment (watching the clinician's face and speaking the target words or phrases in unison with her) but is minimally stimulable using other types of cue.  This study will deliver speech therapy via speech entrainment in which the participant will practice producing 5 sets of 10 functional words with some stimuli being practiced via traditional in-person clinic conditions while other stimuli is practiced only at home with the client following along with speech entrainment videos posted by the researchers on YouTube. There will also be experimental conditions combing these modalities of delivery.  This study will involve an estimated 30 minutes of therapy/practice each day of the week with no therapy delivered via in-person or YouTube on Saturday or Sunday. The study will run for 5 consecutive weeks. 

Results will compare the participant’s progress on ability to produce target words/phrases delivered by in-person therapy versus therapy delivered via recording posted on YouTube and practiced at home by the client. 

The potential benefits of knowing if speech entrainment can be effectively delivered via recording and not via live clinician has the potential to provide a form of speech therapy to anyone that needs this but cannot access it for socioeconomic or physical restrictions.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Describe the potential role of speech entrainment in aphasia therapy.

 

2.    Describe potential benefits/drawbacks to delivering this kind of therapy in-person versus using pre-recorded videos as homework.

 

3.    Conceptualize this therapy strategy as potentially a stand alone method of therapy when needed.  

Biography: 

Hunter Manasco Ph.D. CCC-SLP is a Professor in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology at Mississippi University for Women. Dr. Manasco’s areas of specialization include neuroanatomy, aphasia, motor speech disorders, traumatic brain injury, and autism. Dr. Manasco has taught in the field of Speech-Language Pathology for over a decade. He has worked clinically in acute care, long-term care, hospice, adult rehabilitation, as well as in school and hospital based pediatrics. He has presented and published numerous research papers in his areas of specialty. He is best for known for his textbook An Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders published by Jones and Bartlett Learning and his children’s book An Exceptional Children’s Guide to Touch published by Jessica Kingsley of London.

Disclosures:

Hunter Manasco Ph.D. CCC-SLP - Mississippi University for Women

Financial – I receive a yearly salary as an academic instructor and clinical supervisor for those services provided at the Mississippi University for Women.   Teaching, speaking, and clinical supervision are part of my salaried position.

Nonfinancial -  No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.

 

Ashley Alexander, M.S., CCC-SLP - Mississippi University for Women

Financial – I receive a yearly salary as an academic instructor and clinical supervisor for those services provided at the Mississippi University for Women.   Teaching, speaking, and clinical supervision are part of my salaried position.

Nonfinancial -  No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.

 

Allison Topcik BS - Mississippi University for Women

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Bailey Miller BS- Mississippi University for Women

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Title: 

Knowledge and Perceptions of SLP Graduate Students Regarding Multiculturalism

Author:

L. Amanda Mathews, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, Evy Jewell Hayes

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

Populations in the United States rise daily, as do the number of people who are considered multicultural. With this comes a greater need for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who are able to assess and treat such individuals— a training process that begins in graduate programs. The primary objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and perceptions of graduate students in speech-language pathology as it pertains to multiculturalism. A survey was conducted to explore graduate students’ knowledge and perceptions of multicultural topics. Participants were recruited from programs in the southeastern United States via email. Just under 400 surveys were returned with 322 complete responses received. Most graduate programs are covering multicultural and multilingual topics across courses to prepare students to work with such populations in future careers. Students recognize the importance of these topics because the opportunities to work with multicultural and multilingual clients are becoming more frequent. A firm foundation can set the tone for an SLP’s career; without adequate training in the area of multiculturalism , many individuals may receive inadequate services whether the SLP recognizes the gaps in care or not.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Explore the current perspectives of SLP graduate students regarding multiculturalism.

 

2.    Compare perceptions to the 2023 CAA standard changes regarding teaching multiculturalism.

 

3.    Discuss the implications of adequate multiculturalism training in SLP graduate programs.

Biography: 

Dr. L Amanda Mathews is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Mississippi. Her research interests include the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Multiculturalism and Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Clinically, she specializes in AAC, Childhood Apraxia of Speech and Pediatric Language Disorders.

Disclosures:

Dr. L Amanda Mathews – The University of Southern Mississippi    

Financial – Salary; Employment; Assistant professor

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Evy Jewell Hayes- The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Title: 

Success Factors of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Post Early Intervention

Author:

L. Amanda Mathews, Ed.D., CCC-SLP,  Kathryn Roberts

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

Children with complex communication needs often require augmentative and alternative forms of communication (AAC) to efficiently convey messages across various settings (Barker et al., 2013). Early implementation of AAC devices for this particular population has been proven successful through the improvement of speech production and language development (Topia & Hocking, 2012). Several factors play an important role in a child’s success or abandonment of an AAC device including speech-language pathologist (SLP) expertise, familial support and perceptions, AAC acceptance, and availability of AAC therapeutic services. This survey-based study explored factors related to success of AAC post early intervention programs through a 33 question anonymous parent survey that included a population of 129 with a respondent sample size of 29.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Define AAC and its role in Early Intervention.

 

2.    Identify success factors regarding AAC use in the early intervention population.

 

3.    Discuss barriers to successful use of AAC beyond Early Intervention,

Biography: 

Dr. L Amanda Mathews is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Mississippi. Her research interests include the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Multiculturalism and Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Clinically, she specializes in AAC, Childhood Apraxia of Speech and Pediatric Language Disorders.

Disclosures:

Dr. L Amanda Mathews – The University of Southern Mississippi    

Financial – Salary; Employment; Assistant professor

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Kathryn Roberts- The University of Southern Mississippi

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 3:00-5:00

Title: 

Telling our Tales:  Stories and Academic Lives

Author:

Carol Westby, PhD, CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

2.0 Hours

Abstract: 

Increasing attention has been given to the importance of personal narratives, particularly those triggered by autobiographical memories and integrated into life stories. Such personal narratives and life stories are associated with the development of a sense of identity, self-regulation, and social problem-solving. From their emergence at the end of the preschool years through adulthood, autobiographical memories provide the foundation for relating personal narratives of individual experiences. From mid-elementary through adolescence, these narratives of individual experiences are gradually strung together into life stories of increasing temporal, causal, and thematic coherence. Persons may not have equal skills with fictional and personal narratives. Those with autism and some types of language and behavioral difficulties exhibit greater difficulty with personal than fictional narratives.

Many narrative intervention strategies have focused on teaching narrative structure, particularly the structure characteristic of fictional stories. Although recognizing narrative structure is an important narrative skill, it is not sufficient for comprehending characters’ motivations, the way characters drive the plot, and the story themes. Personal life stories require that children and adolescents understand how their physical and psychological characteristics influence the ways they respond to events. Children who understand these concepts in fictional stories are better able to construct personal stories from their autobiographical narratives. Adults can help children draw upon and elaborate autobiographical memories; and then assist them in using what they have learned about plots, characters, and themes in fictional stories to organize their personal narrative and life stories. 

In this seminar discover the nature of autobiographical memory and the role of personal event narratives and life stories in the development of self-identity and self-regulation; and learn strategies to assess and develop children’s and adolescents’ personal narratives and life stories. 

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Describe the foundations of personal narratives

 

2.    Explain why personal narratives are a critical aspect of development

 

3.    Implement strategies to facilitate students’ telling of coherent personal event narratives and life stories

Biography: 

Dr. Carol Westby, PhD, CCC-SLP, is a consultant for Bilingual Multicultural Services in Albuquerque, NM and holds an affiliated appointment in Communication Disorders at Brigham Young University in Provo, UT. She is a fellow of the American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA), has received the Honors of ASHA and the Kleffner Lifetime Clinical Achievement Award, and holds Board Certification in Child Language and Language Disorders. Dr. Westby has received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from Geneva College and the University of Iowa's Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and the ASHA Award for Contributions to Multicultural Affairs. She is widely recognized for her development of the Westby Playscale, an assessment tool for young children. She had published and presented nationally and internationally on a wide variety of topics including screen time and learning in the 21st century, assessing and facilitating play in children, theory of mind, narrative development, adverse childhood experiences, and issues in assessment and intervention with culturally/linguistically diverse populations. Dr. Westby has a BA in English from Geneva College and an MA and PhD in Speech Pathology from the University of Iowa.

Disclosures:

Carol Westby, PhD, CCC-SLP

Financial Disclosures

• Receives an honorarium and travel expenses from the Mississippi Speech, Language, Hearing Association for this presentation

• Supervises first year speech-language pathologists for Bilingual Multicultural Services, Albuquerque, NM USA 

• Receives an honorarium for producing Word of Mouth, a newsletter for school speech-language pathologists for Pro-Ed

Nonfinancial Disclosures

• Is a member of the American Board of Child Language/Language Disorders

• Is a consultant to the Global Tales project of the IALP Child Language Committee

• Is a member of the IALP Autism Committee 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 3:00-4:00

Title: 

The Science of Reading and Language Movement

Author:

Rachel Ryan

Instructional Level: 

Intermediate

Time: 

1.0 Hour

Abstract: 

Science of Reading or SoR has been around for more than 200 years. Recently, this term has been used to refer to a body of research that stems from the fields of education, cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and neuroscience. This research has led to a vast knowledge base on reading and writing development, reasons why some students have difficulty learning these skills, and how to most effectively assess and teach students. In turn, this improves student outcomes through the prevention and intervention of reading difficulties. This session is designed to give an overview of the science of reading and how general and special education teachers, speech-language pathologists, and dyslexia therapists play an important role in these research-backed educational practices. 

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

4.    Describe the Simple View of Reading, the Reading Rope, the pillars of the National Reading Panel, and the Science of Reading Movement. 

 

5.    Describe the link between language and literacy 

 

6.    Descibe their role in the Science of Reading.

Biography: 

Rachel Ryan, MCD, CCC-SLP, CALT, is the assessment coordinator at the DuBard School for Language Disorders at The University of Southern Mississippi.  She is a nationally certified speech-language pathologist and certified academic language therapist.  She holds Mississippi licensure in Speech-Language Pathology and endorsements in Mild to Moderate Disabilities in Special Education and Hearing Disabilities. 

Disclosures:

Rachel Ryan, MCD, CCC-SLP, CALT -  DuBard School for Language Disorders

Financial- She is employed by DuBard School for Language Disorders; course development and presentations are included in salaried duties.

 

Nonfinancial- no relevant nonfinancial relationship exists.

 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 3:30-5:00

Title: 

Mentoring, Coaching, and Nurturing the Next Generation of SLPs

Author:

Whitney D. Perkins, M.S., CCC-SLP, Ed.D. and Jennifer Wiles  Au.D., CCC-A, LSLS Cert AVEd

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1.5 Hours

Abstract: 

The purpose of this session is to discuss strategies that are used at a Historically Black College and University (HBCU) in Mississippi to nurture, coach and mentor students in undergraduate and graduate CMD programs.  The presentation will highlight ways that programs can consider cultural, linguistic, and generational differences to build the mentoring relationships, identify barriers related to successful mentorship, and implement processes to promote self-reflection and growth of mentorship.   Case study scenarios will be used to highlight various strategies used to foster mentorship across programs.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Identify cultural, linguistic, and generational differences to consider in the mentoring relationship.

 

2.    Identify barriers related to successful mentorship. 

 

3.    Implement a process to promote self-reflection and growth of mentorship.

Biography: 

Whitney D. Perkins serves as the clinical coordinator and undergraduate program coordinator in the Department of Communicative Disorders at Jackson State University (JSU).  She also serves as the National Student Speech-Language and Hearing Association (NSSLHA) chapter advisor at JSU.  She has graduate degrees in Deaf Education, Communicative Disorders, and Early Childhood Education.  

 

Jennifer Wiles received her Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Sciences from the University of Southern Mississippi and her Doctorate of Audiology from the University of Memphis.  Following graduation, she obtained certification as a Listening and Spoken Language Specialist.   She has provided aural rehabilitation and family coaching services to diverse populations across the state of Mississippi.  She has also taught, advised, mentored, and supervised both undergraduate and graduate students across Communication Disorders and Oral Deaf Education programs.  She is currently employed at Jackson State University in the Department of Communicative Disorders.

Disclosures:

Whitney D. Perkins, M.S., CCC-SLP, Ed.D.– Jackson State University

Financial – Salary; Employment;

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

Jennifer Wiles  Au.D., CCC-A, LSLS Cert AVEd .– Jackson State University

Financial – Salary; Employment;

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exists

 

 

Friday, September 23, 2022, 3:30-4:30

Title: 

Feeding and Cleft Lips/Palates

Author:

Alyssa Nuzzo,  M.S., CCC-SLP

Instructional Level: 

Introductory

Time: 

1.0 Hour

Abstract: 

Feeding a baby with a cleft lip/palate is a unique experience. There are several factors to consider for the best feeding outcomes. This presentation will cover ways to promote a positive feeding experience for babies born with clefts.

Learning Objectives:

Following the session, attendees will be able to:

 

1.    Identify speciality feeders/bottle systems for babies with cleft lips/palates

 

2.    Identify  stress cues during PO feedings and determine how to modify the feeding for successfully outcomes.

 

3.    Identify common factors that promote success feeding outcomes for babies with cleft lips/palates.

Biography: 

Alyssa Nuzzo, M.S., CCC-SLP is a neonatal speech-language pathologist. Alyssa received her B.S. in Communicative Sciences and Disorders from the University of Mississippi and received her M.S. in Speech, Language, and Learning from Northwestern University in Chicago. Alyssa completed her CFY at Laskin Therapy Group in Ridgeland, MS. She became a full-time faculty member at UMMC in 2019. From 2019-2021, Alyssa was a pediatric outpatient SLP focusing on evaluation and treatment for medically complex patients. In 2021, Alyssa became a full time neonatal SLP at UMMC. She works in the only level IV Nicu in the state providing services for patients with neonatal/developmental feeding and swallowing disorders. In 2021, Alyssa was voted “SLP of the Year” by her colleagues. She is a member of ASHA and MSHA. She is currently serving at the MSHA membership committee chair.

Disclosures:

Alyssa Nuzzo, M.S., CCC-SLP

Financial – No relevant financial relationship exists.

Nonfinancial – Membership Committee Chair for MSHA