Annual Continuing Education Conference

Session Abstracts

3/22/18 version

Pre-Conference

School-Age Stuttering Therapy: A Practical Approach
Presenter: J. Scott Yaruss

School-age children who stutter can face many challenges, both in and out of the classroom. Common problems include negative emotional reactions, such as embarrassment and anxiety; difficulties reading aloud in class or participating in group discussions; and limitations while interacting with peers. Unfortunately, many speech-language pathologists report that they are not confident in their ability to help children deal with these consequences of stuttering. Clinicians also report uncertainty about meeting eligibility criteria, generalizing gains made in the therapy room to real-world situations, and dealing with problems like bullying. The purpose of this workshop is to provide clinicians with applicable, practical strategies for helping school-age children and adolescents who stutter overcome the problems associated with stuttering. The presentation will include: specific guidelines for conducting comprehensive evaluations that support treatment recommendations and goal-writing; detailed instructions for how to prepare children for therapy to ensure success; and video examples of numerous treatment strategies and activities designed to help children improve their fluency, reduce their negative reactions to stuttering, educate others about stuttering, and communicate effectively across speaking situations. Participants will come away from the workshop feeling more confident in their ability to help children who stutter and more knowledgeable about how to approach stuttering assessment and treatment in the school setting and beyond.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Design efficient, effective, and comprehensive diagnostic evaluations of school-age children and adolescents who stutter. 2. Select and implement several appropriate treatment strategies for helping school-age children and adolescents who stutter speak more easily and communicate more effectively. 3. Help students identify, understand, and overcome affective and cognitive reactions to stuttering.

Conference

Creating Intelligible Speech: Practical Strategies from a Practicing Clinician
Presenter: Molly Thompson

Participants will walk through the process of parent interview, evaluation and treatment in children with speech sound disorders. The primary focus is treatment and strategies that have proven effective for habilitating speech in phonological disorders, childhood apraxia of speech and dysarthria. Carryover methods, current research, sample case studies and documentation examples will be provided.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Identify 3 different methods for facilitating sounds in children with speech delays/disorders. 2. Will identify related conditions that impact progress in speech production. 3. Will identify tools and apps for homework and carryover.

Treating Speech Disorders with the Fab Four
Presenter: Sherry Sancibrian

Linguistic approaches to treating SSDs share a common goal of teaching sound/feature contrasts and appropriate phonological patterns, but the unique characteristics of each approach can help the SLP identify a “best fit” for a particular child.  Through case studies of John, Paul, George, Ringo, and Maggie participants will learn to utilize contrast therapy, cycles training, language-based, and nonlinear approaches.  Innovative service delivery models will also be addressed.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Identify key features of 5 linguistic approaches to treating speech sound disorders 2. Draw comparisons across interventions in terms of “best fit” for a specific case. 3. Implement varied service delivery models at different stages of intervention

 

Dynamic Assessment: Examining Learning Potential and Reducing Bias in Assessment
Presenter: Marie Ireland

Participants will review the evidence on diagnostic accuracy of standardized tests and dynamic assessment methods, and examine "Test-teach-retest" using formal and informal techniques. Evaluation of learning potential and methods to reduce bias in assessment will be reviewed. Current research, sample case studies and report writing considerations will be provided.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Identify the 3 major types of dynamic assessment techniques. 2. Describe how dynamic assessment addresses bias in assessment. 3.List standardized and informal dynamic assessment methods.

Addressing Social-Communication and Play Goals for Preschoolers with Autism in School Settings
Presenter: Linda Watson

Limitations in social-communication and pretend play among young children with ASD are widely acknowledged, and affect the ability of these children to achieve academic success and build social relationships with adults and peers in the school setting. Thus, it is important to address these skills early; however, preschool education teams, including speech-language pathologists who serve on these teams, often struggle to find effective and collaborative ways to improve these key skills in their young students with ASD. This course will explain how improving social communication and play skills in children with ASD can have cascading effects on a wider array of skills and learning opportunities, and will provide practical information and resources to help speech-language pathologists work with their education team colleagues to choose goals and strategies that will support the development of social-communication and play in preschoolers with ASD.

Expected Learner Outcomes:1.Explain to others (e.g., parents, teachers, and/or administrators) how working on social-communication and play goals can contribute to improvements in broader outcomes for preschoolers with ASD. 2. Use developmental sequences to choose appropriate, individualized social-communication and play goals, and apply simple decision rules to determine when to modify the goals. 3.Select evidence-based intervention strategies adapted to behavior and learning patterns common among young children with ASD.

Hearing Aid Verification using Real Ear Measures: Why and How
Presenter: Melinda Bryan

This course will review the importance of and procedure to conduct real ear, simulated real ear, and real ear to coupler difference (RECD) measures on individuals with impaired hearing. This course will include case studies and describe research relating to real ear measurements.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Discuss the importance and benefits of completing real ear measurements on each hearing aid patient. 2.Explain the difference between real ear measures, simulated real ear measures, and real ear to coupler difference measures. 3.Interpret the results of real ear measurements.

Clinical Application of Acceptable Noise Level
Presenter: Melinda Bryan

One complaint of hearing aid users is difficulty communicating in noise. Acceptable noise level (ANL) has been proposed as an effective method to predict hearing aid success. This presentation will address acceptance of noise with particular attention to a demonstration of the ANL and its application to fitting hearing aids.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Measure and calculate acceptable noise levels. 2. Discuss the interpretation of an individual’s acceptable noise level. 3. Discuss the clinical utility of an individual’s acceptable noise level.

 

Back to the Seventies: Traditional Treatment for Speech Sound Disorders Revisited
Presenter: Sherry Sancibrian

The diversity of speech sound disorders presents a considerable challenge when selecting intervention approaches that are efficient, effective, and evidence-based. Are traditional motor-based treatments as outdated as leisure suits, lava lamps, and the Brady Bunch? Learn how to combine current thinking about motor learning with “tried and true” techniques to correct sound production errors.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Identify key features of a motor-based approach 2. Identify client-clinician-caregiver variables that support use of a motor-based approach. 3.Contrast traditional and contemporary motor learning hierarchies

Hidden Hearing Loss
Presenter: Annette Hurley

At some time in our career, we have encountered patents with complaints of difficulty hearing or understanding speech, despite a normal audiogram. Recently, investigators have identified “Hidden Hearing Loss” as a condition that might be responsible for this phenomenon. This session will review the research basis for hidden hearing loss, how this differs from auditory processing disorder, and review cases that differentiate these diagnoses.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Describe audiometric and behavioral symptoms of hidden hearing loss. 2. Describe the causes of hidden hearing loss 3. Describe treatment for hidden hearing loss

 

Cognitive and Cognitive-Linguistic Communication Disorders
Presenter: Scott Rubin

This session includes clinically relevant background information on the Cognitive Communication Disorders; typically associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and right-hemisphere disorder (RHD). Topics include the bases of neurogenic cognitive disorders, as well as evaluation and treatment of related deficits. Attendees are encouraged to participate with questions, comments, and discussion. There are also two small group activities for attendees to collaborate and share clinical applications.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Identify hemispheric and system specific cognitive functions related to communication disorders. 2. Outline evaluation techniques for the cognitive and cognitive-linguistic disorders.3. Create unique, functional, patient centered treatment activities/tasks focused on targeted cognitive communication deficits

Audiology Grand Rounds
Presenter: Annette Hurley

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Discuss the definition of educationally significant hearing loss. 2. Describe auditory training programs that might be used during auditory rehabilitation. 3. Describe treatment options for auditory neuropathy dys-synchrony disorder

Overcoming Adversity - with a "Little" Adjustment
Presenter: Greg Little

On June 17, 1972 Greg Little's life changed forever. Following a horrific automobile accident, he survived a traumatic brain surgery (TBI), an eight day coma, weeks of paralysis and had to relearn how to walk and talk. He was faced with the normal consequences of TBI, such as short-term memory loss, anxiety/depression and poor impulse control. He now teaches groups how they are limited only by their own ability to adapt.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Teach their clients how to "know the enemy." 2. Teach their clients the key to effective communication. 3. Teach their clients the key to effective speaking.

Vestibular Testing and Rehabilitation—What’s Not to Love?
Presenter: Margot Beckerman

This presentation will focus on the vestibular testing and rehabilitation for audiologists “in the trenches.” Following a brief overview of vestibular and balance system anatomy, various components of the vestibular test battery will be reviewed. A discussion of commonly seen test administration and interpretation pitfalls will be presented, along with solutions to overcome or avoid the negative impact these may have on vestibular test results. Case presentations will highlight how test findings drive various vestibular rehabilitation approaches.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Identify normal and abnormal testing findings on various components of the vestibular test battery. 2. Identify pitfalls associated with administration and interpretation of various portions of the vestibular test battery. 3. Identify basic concepts of vestibular rehabilitation and appropriateness of various rehabilitation strategies.

Universal Licensure for Mississippi - 2 Professions, Many Settings, 1 License
Presenters: Rachel Powell, Josie Alston, C.G. Marx, & Carolyn Wiles Higdon

In Mississippi, SLPs and audiologists may be licensed by the Department of Education in schools, and the Department of Health in all other practice settings. ASHA has identified that universal licensure as a public policy priority, and currently 23 states have implemented universal licensure. This session will explore the licensing and governing bodies of Mississippi, and discuss talking points on moving towards universal licensure in our state. Roundtable discussions facilitated by members of the MSHA Ad Hoc Committee on Universal Licensure will give members and other professionals across practice settings the opportunity to provide their input and feedback on proposed universal licensure.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. The learner will identify the different types of licensure across practice settings in Mississippi for SLPs and audiologists. 2. The learner will identify the advantages and disadvantages of moving towards universal licensure. 3. The learner will give input on the impact of universal licensure to SLPs and audiologists in a variety of Mississippi practice settings.

Artfully Speaking: Using the Visual Arts In Treatment of Cognitive Linguistic Disorders
Presenter: Lisa Abbott Moore

Communication disorders after TBI are estimated to occur 80-100% of the time (Cherney & Miller, 1991; Halpern et al. 1973). These disorders present with a myriad of complex and sometimes subtle difficulties that can be difficult for both the skilled and unskilled listener to discern. These difficulties manifest in all areas of communication including listening, speaking, reading, writing, and social interactions, and have an impact in a variety of communicative settings (work, family, community, school, religious functions, and close relationships). The use of the arts in healthcare has many well documented benefits and researchers have found evidence of the benefits of the arts in healthcare in hospitals, nursing homes, senior centers, private homes, or other locations within the community. Quantitative and qualitative research from across healthcare disciplines—and documented in peer-reviewed journals—provides evidence of both instrumental and intrinsic benefits 13 2009 State of the Field Report: Arts in Healthcare of arts in healthcare. This presentation will provide a description of the salient features of cognitive communication disorders and how they impact a client’s daily life, discuss the evidenced based benefits of using the visual arts in healthcare and in the therapeutic session, and provide a “hands on” demonstration of using the visual arts (art journaling, drawing, etc.) with the client who has cognitive communication disorders. We will end the session with developing a functional treatment plan and answer any questions related to the information presented in this lecture.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Attendees will describe 3 aspects of a cognitive communication disorder. 2. Attendees will describe 3 applications of using art as a therapeutic modality. 3. Attendees will list 5 benefits of using the arts in healthcare/communication therapy.

Feeding Therapy: A Behavioral Management Approach
Presenter: Rachel Tyrone

Have you dealt with a child with behavioral issues? Do these behaviors often interfere with your treatment goals? More specifically, have you attempted feeding therapy with a child with significant behavioral difficulties? This presentation will briefly discuss how medical diagnosis can later lead to behavioral difficulties when it comes to mealtime. This course will provide you with an evidence based behavioral management technique developed from clinical behavioral psychologists that can be effective during evaluations and treatment sessions. This course will provide you with a means to address these behaviors in order to reach your short and long term treatment goals.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Identify and understand how medical diagnosis can lead to behaviors.2. Implement techniques that will build rapport between the patient and therapist.3. Provide behavioral management techniques during treatment sessions in order to reach treatment goals.

Knowledge Bowl
Presenter: Amy Livingston

Graduate students and undergraduate students will be given the opportunity to prepare for the Praxis examination in speech-language pathology and audiology by participating on teams in a knowledge bowl format. Test construction, format, and test taking strategies will be highlighted. Teams will be comprised of Audiology and Speech-language pathology students from different universities from around the state. They will be asked questions from previous Praxis exams as well as practice exams in a game show format. Subject matter experts will provide clarification and examples for questions requiring greater focus. Audience members will be encouraged to provide their perspectives.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Participants will be able to relate questions to actual clinical and professional practice of Speech-language pathology and Audiology. 2. Participants will be able to demonstrate knowledge and insight from subject matter experts from speech science, audiology, private practice, medicine practice, public schools, universities, and ASHA as they elaborate on the answers to questions. 3. Participants will be able to identify the most up to date evidence based information regarding state and national standards of practice and ASHA code of ethics for speech-language pathology for speech science, dysphagia, and audiology.

 

Managing Concussion: The Role of the Speech Language Pathologist
Presenter: Hailey Middleton

Successful management of concussions requires an interdisciplinary approach that understands the unique neurobehavioral and neurocognitive symptoms associated with concussions. In this short seminar, we will look at the role of the SLP specifically in how we play a valuable role in identifying post-concussion symptoms promptly so that those may successfully return to athletic, academic, and social activities with ease.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. After the presentation, participants will be able to identify 22 signs and symptoms of concussion.2. After the presentation, participants will be able to define post-concussion syndrome. 3. After the presentation, participants will be able to list various treatment approaches for short term memory.

Write On! The Case for Cursive
Presenter: Susan Perry

A new Mississippi law mandates that instruction in cursive writing will become part of the basic elementary education curriculum, beginning with the 2018-19 school year. Why is cursive writing important? What is the best way to teach children cursive handwriting? This session will explore these and other questions about cursive writing and will discuss how cursive writing is taught at the DuBard School for Language Disorders at USM.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Name two goals for handwriting. 2. Explain two reasons for teaching handwriting. 3. Name two non-motor processes involved in handwriting.

Integrating Communication Device Use into Classroom Activities
Presenters: Tracy Curtis & Kym Heine

This presentation will discuss various strategies for facilitating the spontaneous use of a communication device in the classroom setting. Participants will view videos of device users communicating during circle time, independent work centers and free time. Instruction on selecting appropriate target vocabulary and teaching various forms and functions of communication will be emphasized.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Collaborate with the teacher to facilitate use of the communication device in the classroom. 2. Identify vocabulary to target for various classroom activities 3.Identify various forms and functions of language to teach.

 

Four Learning Pathways Model: Understanding Diverse Trajectories in Children with Hearing Loss (Birth-6)
Presenter: Marietta Paterson

This presentation will present a Four Learning Pathways model to better describe the diversity of factors that impact early childhood learning in children with hearing loss-Birth to Six years and readiness for school. The model is based on the age at detection and initiation of early intervention. This model evolved from teaching and practice with graduate students to help explain the need for flexibility in assessment, planning, and adaptations of service and supports. No one size fits all in early intervention and it does make a difference when a child starts and what other factors may facilitate or impede developments. We now see and expect that more infants and young children with hearing loss will follow typical sequences and timetables of speech and language development and early literacy. However, many children are still lost to early intervention as there is no follow-up after diagnosis, late to intervention, late or inconsistent users of hearing technology or are EL - English Language learners. Another group of diverse learners are the estimated 40% of D/HH children who present with additional challenges. The four learning pathways presented provides a framework for informing families, communities, schools and programs, as well as our teacher-training programs in determining options and best-practices for diverse learners with hearing loss as they learn in the early childhood years.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Identify the Four Learning Pathways by age at detection of hearing loss.2.Explain one intrinsic-child related risk factor that impacts language outcome and school readiness. 3. Explain one extrinsic environment related risk factor for children with hearing loss whose families first language is not English.

 

LENA Technology: Automated Language and Speech Data Use in Early Intervention
Presenter: Marietta Paterson

Writing Legally Defensible Speech/Language Evaluation Reports
Presenter: Edie Jones

The vast majority of cases that are filed against school districts have to be settled. Since the assessment is the foundation of any IEP, the main reason there is a settlement is indefensible evaluation reports. Most assessors’ reports are indefensible due to an accumulation of minor defects. So, what does this mean for us? This presentation will help you decipher the law and apply it to your reports. There will be a section-by-section review of what is needed in a legally defensible speech/language report. At the end of this presentation you will receive three sample handouts: 1. Assessment Batteries Descriptions and Charts 2. Summary and Interpretations of Test Findings 3. Sample Speech/Language Evaluation Report.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. To understand the process of conducting a legally defensible speech/language evaluation. 2. To understand the components of a legally defensible speech/language evaluation. 3. To write a legally defensible speech/language evaluation report.

 

Getting to know MS Medicaid's Speech and Hearing Services
Presenters: Cindy Brown & Mary K. Ulmer

The Division of Medicaid (DOM) defines speech therapy services as medically prescribed services necessary for the diagnosis and treatment of communication impairment and/or swallowing disorder that has occurred due to disease, trauma or congenital anomaly. This session will cover the Requirements, Provider Policy, Prior Authorization/ Pre-Certification authorized and more.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Requirements for Covered Services. 2. Prior Authorization and Pre- Certification. 3.How Medicaid defines Speech Therapy.

All Tied Up! A Look at the Effects of Tongue and Lip Tie on Feeding
Presenter: Jenna Nassar

Tongue and lip tie can have negative effects on feeding. When coupled with other comorbidities, they can make feeding very difficult. This course will focus on identification, feeding behaviors associated with restrictions, and how to navigate the referral process.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Identify the various types of lip tie. 2. Identify the various types of tongue tie. 3. Identify common feeding behaviors associated with the restrictions

 

Can You Smell Smoke? Don't Let Burnout Take Hold of Your Career!
Presenter: Josie Alston

When you sit around with your SLP/AUD friends after hours are you discussing the latest statistical significance highlighted in a peer reviewed journal on linguistic complexities with pre-term infants? Of course not! You are talking about caseloads and charting and HIPPA and IEPs and coding and inadequate staffing and how to get it ALL done. If you are like one of thousands of SLPs/AUDs feeling overwhelmed at work then don't fret! YOU are not alone! There may be some easy solutions for you to regroup, take an inventory, find your focus, take back control and recharge your batteries to be able to go in a new direction and re-energize your SLP/AUD professional career. Students you are not exempt either! As a matter of fact there are ways to set yourself up for career success with a plan and some easy straightforward goals for the coming years.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Participants will be able to identify the most common signs of burnout. 2. Participants will learn how to design and implement smart goals that make sense. 3.Participants will be able to direct their goals into short action steps towards improving job satisfaction.

Dyslexia 101: What is it, and how do I help?
Presenter: Missy Schraeder

Many students on the SLP caseload have difficulty with written language including reading, spelling and written expression. How do we, as speech-language pathologists, support students with these written language difficulties? This presentation will give simulate some of the difficulties faced by students with written language difficulties and will focus on strategies that SLPs can use to provide multisensory intervention for students with written language difficulties.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.identify difficulties that students may have with written language. 2. List areas of testing used to identify students with written language difficulties. 3.Identify multisensory strategies to improve decoding skills

The Speech-Language Pathologist’s Guide to the Acute Care Setting
Presenters: Laura McCarty & Susan Stringer

In this session led by two speech-language pathologists from the only Trauma 1 hospital in the state, attendees will learn about the role of the adult acute care SLP in evaluating patients with a wide variety of diagnoses. The presentation will provide information on conducting bedside swallow evaluations on patients with and without tracheostomy tubes, modified barium swallow studies, speaking valve assessments, speech/language/cognitive evaluations, follow-up dysphagia therapy sessions, and dysphagia at the end of life.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Provide one reason for requesting a physician’s order for a modified barium swallow study. 2.Name one contraindication for placement of a speaking valve. 3. Name 2 components of a clinical swallow evaluation.       

IPP IRL! How to Develop an Interprofessional Journal Club to Boost Collaboration & Patient Care
Presenter: Clarion Mendes

In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared Interprofessional and Collaborative Practice (IPP) as vital for strengthening health care systems and improving health outcomes. As a result, many health professions are re-examining their approaches to patient care. The American Speech-Language & Hearing Association (ASHA) has responded to the IPP movement by revising its Code of Ethics, making IPP a part of its Envisioned Future: 2025, and including IPP as a convention theme. Despite the importance of IPP, and access to IPP resources, it can be difficult to apply in a medical setting, where there seems to be ever increasing demands upon a clinician’s time. In this hands-on session, you will learn how to implement an interprofessional journal club in your facility that will increase team collaboration and improve patient care, without creating additional burden for your colleagues.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Utilize the interprofessional journal club toolkit in their setting to improve collaborative care. 2. Identify and avoid obstacles that impact the success of a journal club. 3.Apply the principles of IPP to their setting.

Clinical Electrophysiological Assessment and Intraoperative Monitoring of the Facial Nerve
Presenter: William Mustain

Electrophysiological assessment is an important tool in clinical management of facial nerve injury, while intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring helps prevent facial nerve damage during surgical procedures. This presentation will review mechanisms of facial nerve injury, methods of clinical assessment and management, as well as intraoperative monitoring applications for prevention of surgically induced facial nerve injury. Emphasis will be on electrophysiological assessment and monitoring techniques.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Identify the peripheral branches of the facial nerve. 2.Describe electroneuronography. 3. Explain and recognize lateral spread as it applies to hemifacial spasm

216 Track: Tips and Tricks for Speech Therapists Working in the Schools
Presenters: Melissa Ladner & Amy Livingston

The MSHA Schools' Committee will discuss a wide variety of topics related to articulation diagnostics and therapy. This course will specifically address the needs of a 216 license holders and their unique role in the education system. Those attending this session will be given in depth instructions to make appropriate diagnosis's during articulation assessments and use that information to develop effective and implement therapy plans. Topics such as dialectical differences vs disorders, phonological processes, and oral motor abnormalities will be discussed.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Engage in appropriate diagnostics procedures when completing articulation testing to determine eligibility. 2.Identify key areas of weaknesses from the testing data and write functional and/or academic goals for the student's IEP. 3.Implement effective articulation therapy to remediate deficits in a timely manner

Oral Care in Dysphagic Patients
Presenter: Andrea Lowrie

There is increasing evidence that good oral care can play a role in helping to prevent aspiration pneumonia in patients with dysphagia. As speech-language pathologist, we are asked to make diet consistency recommendations in an effort to prevent aspiration pneumonia, but the role of oral care should not be overlooked. In this session, we will explore the relationship between oral care and risk of aspiration pneumonia and discuss oral care protocols that can be implemented to reduce that risk.

Expected Learner Outcomes: Describe relationship between oral care and the risk of aspiration pneumonia 2.Identify different views toward oral care 3.Identify evidence-based oral care protocols

Administering and interpreting the Ling Six Sound Test with cochlear implant users
Presenter: Marietta Paterson

The Ling SIX Sound Test (Ling, 2001, 1989, Ling & Ling,1978) is a simple speech perception test that is now globally used in the field of education of the deaf and in audiological research. Professor Ling originally invented this test for his graduate students to use as a daily or routine live-check of a child/student’s speech perception capacity that could be related to the child’s audiogram. The six sounds (/u/, /m/, /a/, /i/, /S/, /s/), were chosen to represent the entire range of the sounds of speech from the lowest to the highest frequency (approximately 250-8000 HZ) and can therefore be used to determine the listener’s ability (or inability) to detect all other speech sounds. In this session, participants will learn the background acoustic information for all the six sounds and expectations for speech perception with different cochlear implant users. In addition, participants will learn how to administer the Ling Six Sound Test with attention to duration of presentation, signal to noise ratio and distance from the listener. Participants will practice administration with peers.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Identify the speech acoustic characteristics of the six sounds and relate to the audiogram.2. Explain how to administer the test in detection and discrimination conditions. 3. Explain why it is important to keep your voice loudness normal.

 

Praxis Preparation and Interview/Resume Building: The Price Is Right! 2018 Version!
Presenter: Carolyn Wiles Higdon

This short course is a combination of Praxis Preparation and Job Market preparation. In this session, the changes in the Praxis will be discussed, as well as case examples, and study guides/suggestions that may be useful. The other portion of the short course will be a discussion of the current job market, how to approach preparing for job interviews including the do’s and don’ts of the interview. It is important to have “your act together”, that your first interview sets the stage for your professional career. Check yourself on the basic points before you go on that all-important interview by attending this seminar focused on the basic techniques of a strong interview and resume (CV). Come and have fun with your peers and colleagues as you prepare to move into these life-changing times in your professional career. New addition to the course this year is an opportunity to build your resume on site and to have individual job counseling specific to your situation. Door prizes, too!

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Attendees will be able to list 3 interviewing techniques and tips that will be useful to them during initial job interviews. 2. Attendees will understand the key components, changes and preparation needs for the Praxis Examination. 3. Attendees will be able to outline the key sections of a resume.

 

Feeding the Baby with a Cleft Lip/Palate
Presenter: Mallory Upchurch & Meagan Allen

Do you feel prepared to assess and make appropriate feeding recommendations with the cleft lip/palate infant population? Are you familiar with the various specialty feeding systems and feel comfortable with assembly and proper use of these systems? This session with discuss important information targeting different types of clefts, various specialty bottle feeder systems that are available, and how to provide services to this specific population. Participants will gain hands on experience with use of the various bottle systems and learn how to navigate the complex decision making process with infants who have cleft lip/palate.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Participants will be able to identify and distinguish various types of cleft palates. 2. Participants will be able to demonstrate knowledge, appropriate assembly and use of specialty bottle feeder systems. 3. Participants will be able to identify behavioral stress cues and demonstrate appropriate infant feeding techniques based on evaluation findings

From Research to Practice: Connecting to the Curriculum
Presenters: Rachel Powell & Ashley Meaux

For more than a decade, ASHA has promoted SLPs as active participants in the education of all children through its Roles and Responsibilities of SLPs in Schools Policy. Areas of best practice identified include Response to Intervention, curriculum-based instruction, and service delivery models. Given this time frame, what does the research indicate is the most effective method to make connections to curriculum? This session will discuss the results of an analysis of the current research accessible by school based SLPs, such as the ASHA journals, on the most effective methods of SLPs being involved in the curriculum. Application of the research to practice in how to tie the research to the school’s curriculum will be discussed. Intervention strategies that target curriculum-based instruction will be given. Challenges regarding research for clinical practice will be explored.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Identify ASHA roles & responsibilities.2.Discuss the research regarding curriculum-based language assessment and intervention 3. Application of various service delivery practice via curriculum-based intervention.

 

Hands-On CVC Words
Presenter: Cindy Wiltcher

Teaching emergent and struggling readers to blend sounds together to form words is often a challenge. By “leveling” the words according to sound production and providing students with multi-sensory sound-bending cards, children learn to read fluently. Using this multi-sensory approach helps eliminate reversal of letters and omission of sounds.

Expecter Learner Outcomes: 1. Analyze characteristics of sounds 2. Learn to "level" words according to production of sounds 3. Provide visual and tactile clues for letter sound correspondence

MDE Updates
Presenter: Teresa Laney

This session will inform participants about program changes and updates from the MS Department of Education. The collaboration between MSHA and the MDE will be highlighted.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Learn about key initiatives that affect SLPs in schools. 2. Get updates to licensure guidelines 3.Understand how MSHA and the MDE collaborate

 

AAC Success at 26!!
Presenters: Kym Heine & Kathy Wentland

This presentation includes a case study of a 26 year old client with Lowe’s Syndrome utilizing the Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) approach with an AAC device. It details the initial evaluation, factors that led to a trial use of an SGD and the outcome of the trial period. The implementation of LAMP approach, structuring of treatment activities and the client’s response to training will be also be discussed.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. The learner will identify potential indicators for successful use of a Speech Generating Device (SGD). 2. The learner will understand the methodology of the Language Acquisition through Motor Planning (LAMP) approach and how to structure treatment activities to facilitate communication and language development using a SGD. 3. The learner will understand how these techniques were applied to a 26 year old client with Lowe’s Syndrome with successful outcomes.

Being an Effective Mentor- Guidance for 215s and 216s
Presenter: Melissa Ladner

The MSHA Schools' Committee will discuss a variety of ideas and tips for engaging in a productive and effective mentoring relationship between a 216 Master’s Level Speech Language Pathologist and a 215 Bachelor’s Level Speech Therapist in the schools setting. The 216 Mentoring Tool developed by the MSHA Schools Committee will be reviewed and shared with participants for use in their work environment.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.215’s and 216’s will review their present skill set in the mentoring/mentee relationship and identify areas of strengths and areas of growth. 2. Learners will develop new ideas for engaging in an effective mentoring/mentee relationship that is built on mutual respect and learning. 3. Learners will be introduced to the 216 Mentoring Tool developed by the MSHA Schools Committee and will learn to use it to increase efficiency and skills set of the 216 license holder.

 

Success for Students with Hearing Loss: The Clinical Audiologist's Responsibility
Presenter: Courtney Turner

Because many school districts do not employ educational audiologists, students with hearing loss often do not receive the support services they need to be successful. This session will equip clinical audiologists with the knowledge to be able to advocate for their school-age patients and support school professionals to maximize student success.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Describe the educational impacts of hearing loss. 2. Identify modifications and accommodations to maximize success for students with hearing loss. 3. Describe the legislation that affects children with hearing loss in schools

 

Comprehensive Airway Management, CSA Endoscopy, and the Medical Speech-Language Pathologist
Presenters: Robert Arnold & Donna Landry

Some signs and symptoms traditionally thought by SLP's to represent an oral and/or pharyngeal dysphagia may also indicate a comorbid or even primary esophageal dysphagia as well as lower GI pathology. This course examines physiological disorders of the upper aerodigestive tract including swallow disorders, voice disorders, reflux disorders, cough disorders, and resonance disorders from the unique perspective of a new endoscopically based differential diagnostic algorithm which empowers the SLP to evaluate and make significant contributions to the medical team in terms of comprehensive airway physiology management. Although this technology is not yet widely available, the content discussed has immediate applications in the management of swallow and voice disorders across the healthcare continuum today.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Participants will list 5 pathophysiologies of the lower GI tract which may mask themselves with the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia as well as may also be contributing to voice disorders. 2. Participants will name at least 2 different Level I evidence-based therapies which have been shown to exhibit crossover effects for the management of swallow disorders and voice disorders. 3.Participants will identify 3 rationales for employing the use of a differential diagnostic methodology when evaluating and treating physiological disorders of the upper aerodigestive tract including but not limited to swallow and voice disorders.

Hearing-Impaired, Language and Literacy Lab at The University of Mississippi: Update and Expansion of the Transition Program
Presenters: Rebecca Lowe, Susan Loveall, Kara Hawthorne, Gina Keene, & Amy Livingston

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. The participants will understand the how the HILL program integrates clinical training, student research, and community outreach in the service of children with moderate-to-severe speech, language, and hearing disorders. 2. The participants will learn about both the in-clinic program, the transition program into the public schools and other academic settings, and the home-based therapy component. 3. The participants will be exposed to the research that is being conducted in this program.

The Smilemaker

Presenter: Barbara Fox

This presentation has been in the making for forty-seven years. No one ever feels quite competent enough to address disabled children. When you find yourself as the parent, that means you deal with the issues 24/7. This session is designed to give you some insight into the challenges of parents. My daughter, Kyndal has provided a richness in our family that we could never have imagined.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Understand some unique ways people with Down syndrome learn.2. Accept differences in students as only one feature of their person and not a defining characteristic. 3. Accept the challenge to try unorthodox ways to reach common developmental goals.

Differential Diagnosis and Assessment of the Complex Case to include CP, Neurogenic Disorders, DD/DLD, ASD, and Intellectual Disability
Presenters: Hailey Middleton & Caroline Hunter

This course will discuss various aspects needed to complete a comprehensive assessment based on students’ patterns of their individual strengths and needs. This series will offer Graduate Students as well as New Graduates in their Clinical Fellowship Year advanced information for the management of patients with complex communication disorders.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. After the presentation, participants will be able to identify components of a comprehensive assessment.2. After the presentation, participants will be able to identify communication characteristics in selected populations.3. After the presentation, participants will be able to identify the essential aspects needed when selecting the appropriate tools/testing for these populations.

What is Unique about the DuBard Association Method, and How Does it Help My Struggling Reader?
Presenter: Alison Webster

A phonetic, multisensory approach to teaching speech, language and reading has been used successfully with students with severe communication disorders, specific learning disabilities and dyslexia as well as students in kindergarten and 1st grade general education. This presentation will give a history of the development of the DuBard Association Method® and give an overview of unique features of the method and the language structures taught. Data from intervention with struggling readers will be presented.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Participants will define dyslexia. 2. Participants will describe what is taught through MSLE programs. 3. Participants will list 5 of the 9 distinctive features of the DuBard Association Method.

 

Assessment and Intervention: The Hispanic Child
Presenter: Hortencia Kayser

Mississippi has seen an increase in the number of Hispanic children entering the public schools. The increase in some counties has been substantial enough to put school systems on alert for the needs of the child learning two languages. This presentation will present data concerning the Hispanic population in Mississippi and how monolingual speech language pathologists can assist these children.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Describe the Hispanic population in the state of Mississippi. 2. Describe the assessment of children who speak two languages, English & Spanish. 3. Describe the intervention strategies necessary to assist children learning two languages.

Writing Measurable Articulation Goals
Presenter: Teresa Laney

Participants will learn the components of a measurable goal for articulation. Examples and hands-on practice will be provided.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Select target sounds based on the Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP). 2. Identify the four components of a measurable goal. 3. Understand how to establish the baseline for the annual goal.

Dysphagia through the Life Span
Presenter: Angie Brunson and Jenna Nassar

Dysphagia affects our patients from young to old. It affects approximately 10 million Americans. These patients often present with unique challenges due to varying diagnoses. This session will further delve into how dysphagia impacts patients of all ages and look at the latest research regarding evaluation and treatment.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1:Identify common causes of dysphagia. 2. Differentiate need for various evaluations. 3. Compare various treatment and management modalities.

Research Interests and Clinical Applications of the P1/N1 Complex of the Late Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials
Presenters: Edward Goshorn & C.G. Marx

Recently, the fields of Audiology and Clinical Neurophysiology have witnessed a resurgence in the clinical use of late cortical auditory evoked response potentials(CAEP). Long thought to be involved in higher order neural processing of auditory information, the P1 N1 P2 N2 complex, as well as the P300 response, has been evaluated as a potential clinical marker for various aspects of auditory processing. This program will review a brief history as well as current research trends and clinical applications of the late cortical AEPs, specifically the P1/N1 complex. Issues related to performing these procedures clinically will be discussed.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Attendees will become familiar with late CAEP terminology. 2. Attendees will become familiar with clinical applications of the late CAEPs. 3. Attendees will become familiar with trends in research involving the late CAEPs.

 



 

Posters (SESSION A) Thursday 1:30-3:30

 

Investigating the Relation Between Chemotherapy and Language Deficits in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
Presenters: Jordan Stark & Carolyn Wiles Higdon

The purpose of this pilot study was to determine whether receptive and expressive language is affected by CNS-targeted chemotherapy treatments for individuals with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A sample of 5 participants between the ages of 8-15 with ALL were selected. Standardized measures as well as surveys were used to evaluate language abilities. Because of lack of research in this area, the researchers are planning to expand beyond this pilot study.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Discuss the effects of CNS-targeted chemotherapy treatment on the developing brain. 2.Provide further awareness of the effects of chemotherapy on language development with other professionals 3. Explain the relationship between receptive and expressive language deficits and academic performance.

The Frequency Attenuations of Foam Ear Plugs Affected by User Error of College Students
Presenters: Alyse Lemoine, Rebecca Lowe, Susan Loveall

When not inserted correctly, a hearing protection device's (HPD) effectiveness can be adversely affected. The incorrect placement and use of HPDs is known as user error. The purpose of the present study was to explore the effect of user error by and in college students on foam ear plug attenuation. This was accomplished by determining which frequencies were still perceived by the participant in audiometric hearing tests. Participants were college students, ages 18-24 years with healthy hearing. Participants completed two trial hearing evaluations using both narrow band noise (NBN) and warble tones in sound field: one during which they wore subject-fit (SF) foam ear plugs and one during which they wore experimenter-fit (EF) ear plugs. The subject-fit foam ear plug thresholds were then compared to the experimenter-fit foam ear plug thresholds. A discrepancy in the effects of SF plugs and EF ear plugs was noted in the high frequencies when compared to the low frequencies.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. The participant will be able to state which frequency attenuations are most affected by user error when utilizing foam ear plugs. 2. The participant will learn the difference in how foam ear plugs attenuate different stimuli. 3.The participant will understand the importance of proper utilization of hearing protection.

The Test of Language Development Intermediate 4th ed.
Presenters: Jordan Wade, Claire Gremillion, Ivy Robbins, & Hortencia Kayser

The Test of Language Development Intermediate 4th ed. Is an assessment instrument with 6 subtests. It is described by the publisher as a test that will describe individuals who are significantly below their peers. This test has norms for individuals between the ages of 8 to 17:11 years. The purpose of this poster board presentation is to evaluate this instrument and provide clinicians with information concerning the items on the test that may be biased. Developmental information concerning the language development of African-American English and English-Spanish speaking children will be presented. Items on the test will be identified that may prove to be a hindrance in the correct identification of children with language disorders.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Describe The Test of Language Development Intermediate 4th ed. 2. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by an African- American child. 3. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by a Hispanic child.

Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test 4th Ed.
Presenters: Erin Keefer, Mary Grace Key, Madeline Mabus, & Hortencia Kayser

The Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test 4th is described as measure of receptive vocabulary for Standard American English. The norms are for ages 2:6 - 90+Years. The purpose of this poster board presentation is to evaluate this instrument and provide clinicians with information concerning the items on the test that may be biased. Developmental information concerning the language development of African-American English and English-Spanish speaking children will be presented. Items on the test will be identified that may prove to be a hindrance in the correct identification of children with language disorders.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1: Describe the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test 4th Ed. 2. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by an African-American and Spanish-English speaking child 3. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by a Hispanic child.

Effects of Hearing Loss in Down Syndrome: Assessing Parents’ Knowledge
Presenters: Annalise Valle, Susan Loveall, & Rebecca Lowe

Purpose: Although hearing loss (HL) is prevalent in the Down syndrome (DS) population, there has been little research investigating the effects of this HL on language and literacy skills. Previous research within typical development has indicated that HL often contributes to deficits in language development if not treated. It is therefore necessary that parents of children with DS are well informed regarding early intervention and treatment of HL. A first step towards this goal is to evaluate how informed parents of individuals with DS are regarding signs of HL. Method: Parents/primary caregivers of an individual with DS who are members of NIH’s DS Connect will be invited to participate in a survey study regarding HL and literacy in DS. The survey will measure participants’ demographics, experience with ENT’s and/or audiologists, experience with speech language pathologists (SLPs), general knowledge of HL, developmental milestones, and language and literacy development, as well as their child’s history of HL and language and literacy skills. Results: We anticipate that parents will have difficulty identifying signs of HL and typical developmental milestones in DS.

Expected Learner Outcomes:: 1. Identify the areas in which parents of individuals with Down syndrome need more information regarding the diagnosis, treatment, and effects of hearing loss. 2. Understand the importance of intervention of hearing loss, especially in Down syndrome. 3.Better understand the areas in which hearing loss can affect literacy skills.

The Effects of Verb Transitivity on Pronoun Interpretation in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities
Presenters: Madison Savoy, Andie Zang, Susan Loveall, & Kara Hawthorne

Verbs vary along a continuum of transitivity based on the extent to which the subject of a sentence impacts the object: a high-transitivity verb like kick involves the subject acting in an impactful way on the object, while a low-transitivity verb like hear involves a more incidental relationship between the subject and object. Previous research suggests that verb transitivity impacts how children interpret pronouns. Pyykkonen et al. (2010) reported that when a verb is highly transitive, children considered both the subject and object as potential referents for the pronoun. For example, children thought that the pronoun he in the following story could refer to either the panda or the parrot: “The panda hit the parrot near the hut. He did something very silly….” However when presented with a low transitivity verb, their preference for the subject was significantly stronger: e.g., showing a strong bias towards interpreting he as referring to the panda. The purpose of the present study is to examine how verb transitivity impacts pronoun interpretation for adults with intellectual disabilities (n = 24 to date; n = 32 expected) versus typically developing adults (n = 15 to date; n = 32 expected). We hypothesize that adults with intellectual disabilities will interpret ambiguous pronouns similarly to the children in Pyykkonen et al. (2010) and that there will be a strong effect of verb transitivity on pronoun interpretation. Understanding how adults with intellectual disabilities interpret ambiguous pronouns will help speech language pathologists foster language comprehension skills in clients with intellectual disabilities.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Describe the benefits of eye-tracking as a methodology for individuals with intellectual disabilities. 2. Understand the impacts of verb type on how a listener interprets a pronoun. 3. Gain deeper knowledge of how adults with intellectual disabilities interpret pronouns.

The Validity of Teacher Knowledge of Concussions in School-Age Children
Presenters: Lauren Briscoe & Carolyn Wiles Higdon

Concussion management in school-age children is a rising concern today. Previous research has suggested a need for further studies of concussion awareness of incidents in school-age children. The main purpose of this study was to assess teacher knowledge regarding the definition of concussion, symptoms, appropriate assessments, and management protocols. With increased concussion awareness, one can diagnose/manage concussions in the learning environment improving outcomes. Results showed that teachers lack sufficient knowledge of concussion in school-age children.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Participants will explain how to diagnose and manage concussions as speech-language pathologists. 2.Participants will describe signs and symptoms of concussions as a speech-language pathologist 3.Participants will discuss the effects of concussions on school-age children from a speech-language pathology perspective.

Effects of In-Service Training on School Personnel Regarding Children With Hearing Loss
Presenters: Rebecca Lowe, Susan Loveall-Hague, Delaney Tice, Madden Wilbert, & Shelby Matthews

This study examines the effects of in-service training on the confidence level, comfort level, and knowledge-base of school professionals working with children who have hearing loss in North Mississippi. To successfully instruct, counsel, and interact with a child who has hearing loss, school professionals should have a general knowledge base of hearing loss, amplification systems, academic accommodations/modifications and teaching strategies. If one’s knowledge base is inadequate, one may not feel comfortable, nor confident in interacting with children who have hearing loss. This study had professionals fill out a survey inquiring about their general knowledge base, their comfort level, and their confidence level in working with students who have hearing loss. A teacher in-service was implemented addressing the above key topics. After the in-service, the survey was re-administered assessing change in the school personnel’s knowledge-base, comfort level, and confidence level in working with these students.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.The participants will understand the effects of in-service training on increasing school personnel’s general knowledge base in working with children who have hearing loss. 2. The participants will understand the effects of in-service training on the comfort level of school personnel in working with children who have hearing loss.3.The participants will understand the effects of in-service training on the confidence level of school personnel in working with children who have hearing loss.

Test of Early Language Development 3rd Ed.
Presenters: Kayla Hall, Kim Fowler, & Hortencia Kayser

The authors describe The Test of Early Language Development 3rd Edition (TELD-3) as a norm-referenced, bias-limited instrument designed to assess receptive, expressive, and overall spoken language in children between 2 years and 7 years 11 months of age. The purpose of this poster board presentation is to evaluate this instrument and provide clinicians with information concerning the items on the test that may be biased. Developmental information concerning the language development of African-American English and English-Spanish speaking children will be presented. Items on the test will be identified that may prove to be a hindrance in the correct identification of children with language disorders.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Describe the Test of Early Language Development (3rd Ed.) 2. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by an African-American child living in the South. 3. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by a Hispanic child.

Diagnostic Evaluation of Language Variation (DELV)
Presenters: Brianna Barrett, Danielle Brooks, Lesley Parker, & Hortencia Kayser

Diagnostic Evaluation of Language Variation (DELV) was developed as an assessment instrument to identify African-American children with language disorders. The south has its own variation of African American English that may not be represented in this test. The purpose of this poster board presentation is to evaluate this instrument and provide clinicians with information concerning the items on the test that may be biased. Developmental information concerning the language development of African-American English from the South (Mississippi) will be presented. Items on the test will be identified that may prove to be a hindrance in the correct identification of African American children with language disorders.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1:Describe the components of the DELV-5. 2.Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by an African-American child. 3. Become familiar with the possibilities of incorrect identification among African-American children.

 

The Effects of Textese on the Literacy Abilities of Undergraduate Students
Presenters: Catherine Camargo, Melissa Capocaccia, Saylor Smith, & Sarah Strickland

The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of textese use on literacy development in undergraduate college students. We hypothesized that textese use will not affect language and literacy in undergraduate college students. In our first measure, Textese Survey, the study found individual participants varied in amount of textisms used. In the study’s second measure, the Word Identification task, participants ranged in scores from 11-32 points with an average of 22.6. This data suggests that participants varied in ability to manipulate written language into oral form. Further, the last measure, the Word Identification: Analogies Subtest, participants ranged from 24-58 points with an average of 39.3. This data suggests that participants varied in their ability to correctly provide synonyms or antonyms with auditory and visual stimuli. Upon initial review of the results, data suggests that variability in participant’s results does not yield a consistent trend. Therefore, textism use does not affect language and literacy, but variability within participants produces varying results, but further analysis of the data is warranted for confirmation of this claim.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. After completing the naturalistic text message activity, participants were able to explain and define textisms. 2. After having the spelling and reading tests administered, participants were able to explain the various contexts in which textese is used. 3. After participating in this experiment, participants had an improved knowledge of the impact that text messaging has on literacy abilities.

 

 

 

Poster Sessions (SESSION B) Friday 1:00-3:00p.m.

Speech-Language Pathologist’s Use and Understanding of Evidence-Based Practice
Presenters: Emma Kath Thome & Susan Loveall

The purpose of this project was to to learn about Speech-Language Patholgists’ use and understanding of evidence-based practice. Evidence-based practice is defined by ASHA as the “integration of: clinical expertise/expert opinion, external scientific evidence, and client/patient/caregiver perspectives to provide high-quality services reflecting the interests, values, needs, and choices of the individuals we serve.”

Expected Learner Outcomes:1.Define evidence-based practice and its key components.2. Identify the most commonly used sources for professional information needs. 3. Describe the barriers to engaging in evidence-based practice for SLPs

Prosody in Atypical Populations
Presenters: Kaitlin Connors, Kylie Lindsey, Sarah Fischer, Kara Hawthorne, & Susan Loveall

Prosody plays a major role in both speech production and perception (Bone, Lee, Black, Williams, Lee, Levitt, & Narayana 2014; Peppé, 2009) and is acoustically manifested as differences in fundamental frequency/pitch, duration, and intensity. Deficits in prosody are associated with impaired intelligibility (Klopfenstein, 2009) and negative social perceptions of the speaker (Peppé, 2009). Prosodic impairments are frequently noticed in populations who struggle with speech articulation and language comprehension (Hawthorne & Fischer, 2017), including some etiologies of intellectual disability. However, there is a paucity of research on prosody in these populations. The purpose of this study is to use the the Profiling Elements of Prosodic Systems- Communication (PEPS-C) as a tool to investigate expressive and receptive prosody in adults with intellectual disabilities. The PEPS-C uses five short, paired (receptive and expressive) tasks to assess different functions of prosody in communication (Peppé & McCann 2003), including emotional affect, turn-end, and contrastive stress, thereby allowing for an examination of prosodic strengths and weaknesses. It is hypothesized that adult participants with intellectual disabilities will demonstrate prosodic deficits, and that expressive prosody will be more impaired than receptive prosody.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Describe the importance of prosody in spoken language. 2. Identify how prosody is impaired in those with intellectual disabilities. 3. Critique the strengths and weaknesses of the PEPS-C prosody assessment.

 

The Preschool Language Scales-5th Edition
Presenters: Kaley Bufkin, Chloe Morgan, Genna Edmondson, & Hortencia Kayser

The Preschool Language Scales-5th edition is a popular instrument used by many speech language pathologists to determine if a preschooler has a communication disorder. It has two parts, comprehension and expression. This test has norms for children aged from Birth to 7 years. The publisher describes this test as an interactive assessment of developmental language skills. The purpose of this poster board presentation is to evaluate this instrument and provide clinicians with information concerning the items on the test that may be biased. Developmental information concerning the language development of African-American English and English-Spanish speaking children will be presented. Items on the test will be identified that may prove to be a hindrance in the correct identification of children with language disorders.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Describe the 2 components of the Preschool Language Scales-5th ed. 2. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by an African-American child. 3. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by a Hispanic child.

Test of Language Development Primary 4th ed.
Presenters: Mary Kendall Ware, Mikalya Clouse, Hortencia Kayser, & Kendall King

The Test of Language Development Primary 4th ed. is an assessment instrument with 9 sub-tests. It is described by the publisher as a test that will describe the language of young children. This test has norms for individuals between the ages of 4 to 8 years. The purpose of this poster board presentation is to evaluate this instrument and provide clinicians with information concerning the items on the test that may be biased. Developmental information concerning the language development of African-American English and English-Spanish speaking children will be presented. Items on the test will be identified that may prove to be a hindrance in the correct identification of children with language disorders.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Describe The Test of Language Development Primary 4th ed.2. Describe the items that will be biased of different in response by an African-American child.3. Describe the items that will be biased of different in response by a Hispanic child.

Interactions between contextual and phonetic information in children’s perception of non-native speech
Presenters: Jessamyn Schertz, Alexis Zosel, & Kara Hawthorne

When a talker has a foreign accent, the listener may expect the acoustic/phonetic information to be unreliable. Schertz & Hawthorne (submitted) found that adults rely more on sentence context and less on acoustics when listening to a non-native talker. For example, listeners are more likely to classify a word that is phonetically ambiguous between goat and coat as goat in “The boy milked the ___” when the talker is not a native English speaker. However, this decreases over time as the listener becomes more familiar with the phonetic details of the talker’s accent. In the present study, we are testing how this develops in elementary school-aged children. We hypothesize that children, who have less language experience, will rely more on sentence context than adults, and that this effect will be even stronger when listening to a non-native talker. However, like adults, we predict that children will also increase their reliance on the phonetic information with more exposure to the accent. As the linguistic diversity of Americans continues to increase, it is important to understand the cues children use when listening to a non-native talker. This information will help SLPs facilitate successful communication between ESL learners and children with speech and/or language delays. A better understanding of the interactions between sentence context and phonetic information on the speech perception process will also help illuminate the strategies used by children with auditory processing deficits.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Contrast perception of non-native speech in children and adults. 2.Describe how sentence context and phonetic information interact when listening to non-native versus native speech. 3. Explain how children adjust to non-native speech with exposure over time.

 

The Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing 2nd Ed.
Presenters: Molly McCleskey, Olivia Davis, & Hortencia Kayser

The Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing 2nd Ed. Is an instrument described by the publisher as an instrument to help evaluate phonological processing abilities as a prerequisite to reading fluency. There are two levels, 4-6 and 7-24 years. The purpose of this poster board presentation is to evaluate this instrument and provide clinicians with information concerning the items on the test that may be biased for children ages 4 to 6 years. Developmental information concerning the language development of African-American English and English-Spanish speaking children will be presented. Items on the test will be identified that may prove to be a hindrance in the correct identification of children with language disorders.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.Describe the Comprehensive Test of Phonological Processing 2nd Ed. 2. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by an African-American child. 3. Describe the items that will be biased or different in response by a Hispanic child.

Transitioning Children with Autism into Inclusive General Education Classrooms
Presenters: Katheryn Singer & Carolyn Wiles Higdon

Autism Spectrum Disorder, commonly known as ASD, has been identified as one of the fastest growing developmental disabilities in the United States. However, teachers identify numerous challenges in transitioning children with Autism Spectrum Disorder into an inclusive classroom. For this research, a survey was conducted through Qualtrics and distributed to several early education and special education teachers, in the Mississippi region. All participants were currently, or had previously worked, with children diagnosed with ASD transitioning into their classroom. The purpose of this research is to determine if there are barriers to children with ASD entering general education classroom, what the barriers are, and which therapy methods are beneficial, creating better opportunities for children with ASD to effectively transition into inclusive classrooms.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1.The attendees will be able to define the common barriers to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder entering neurotypical kindergarten classroom. 2. The attendees will be able to Identify treatment and therapy approaches that are most beneficial to children with ASD transitioning into general education classrooms. 3. The attendees will be able to understand the early education teacher’s perception of speech-language pathology.

 

Consistency of Parents and SLP Graduate Clinicians in Reports of Children with Moderate-to-Severe Speech/Language Delays
Presenter: Lauren Collier, Susan Loveall-Hague, & Kara Hawthorne

In order to be effective and have a lasting impact, early childhood interventions should involve parents and communities, so that all environments affecting children can foster similar goals (Bronfenbrenner, 1979). In speech-language therapy, discrepancies and disagreements between parents and clinicians regarding a child’s abilities could alter the applicability of goals, the implementation of therapy, and, ultimately, the child’s improvement. The purpose of this study is to measure parent-clinician consistency in reports of children’s abilities across cognitive, linguistic, and behavioral domains. The study is ongoing, and includes both parents and SLP graduate clinicians of 3-6-year-old children (current n = 11) who are or have been enrolled in the H.I.L.L. Program at the University of Mississippi for children with moderate to severe speech and language delays. Parents and clinicians (who had worked one-on-one with an individual child for approximately 10 weeks) independently completed a series of four standardized assessments regarding the child’s cognitive, linguistic, and behavioral abilities. Across the various assessments, parents and clinicians were most consistent in their reports of the child’s communicative and linguistic abilities. The results have positive implications for children with speech and language disorders, because they suggest consistency of language and communicative skills across multiple settings and raters. However, parents and clinicians were less consistent in their reports of social awareness, motor skills, and restricted interests and repetitive behaviors, suggesting that clinicians should consider parental reports of these skills as part of the goal-writing process.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Gain understanding of how parent-clinician consistency may improve therapy goals. 2.Learn about the importance of “teamwork” between the parent and clinician. 3. Learn about standardized parental measures assessing children’s performance in cognitive, linguistic, and behavioral domains.

 

 

Awareness and Knowledge of Cochlear Implants of Speech-Language Pathologists in Mississippi
Presenters: Kimberly Grubbs & Kimberly Ward
When working with individuals who have received cochlear implants, it is vital that all service providers are knowledgeable regarding use and care, troubleshooting, and device function. Service providers for this population which are crucial to the success of these individuals may be audiologists, nurses, educators, and Speech-Language Pathologists. Speech-Language Pathologists work extremely close with cochlear implant recipients across a multitude of settings including schools, hospitals, and skilled nursing facilities. However, previous research suggests that Speech-Language Pathologists do not have the adequate skills or knowledge to work with clients who have cochlear implants (Babeu, 2016; Compton, Flynn, & Tucker, 2009; Loh, Jiang, Dezso, & Fitzgerald O’Connor, 2008; Fu & Galvin, 2007). In order to assess if the state of Mississippi had similar results as the previous studies, a 32-item questionnaire was emailed to the Speech-Language Pathologists within the state. The results suggest that there was an overall lack in cochlear implant competency, that many participants of this study felt uncomfortable with the components of a cochlear implant, and that many felt their knowledge on cochlear implant resources were limited.

Expected Learner Outcomes: 1. Be able to identify key components of education needed when working with cochlear implants. 2. Gain an understanding of the SLP's knowledge in Mississippi on cochlear implants. 3. Gain an understanding of the available resources for cochlear implants.

 

RECALL Reading Intervention for Children in Preschool and Kindergarten with Severe to Moderate Language Delays
Presenters: Rebekah Bosley, Kara Hawthorne, Sarah Fischer, Susan Loveall, & Karen Kellum

Previous research has documented that dialogic shared-book reading interventions, in which a reader prompts the child with questions and expansions, have been effective in promoting engagement, response rates, vocabulary knowledge, and overall answering accuracy in children with autism (Fleury et. al, 2014; Fleury & Schwartz, 2016; Whalon et al., 2015). Our study expands previous research to investigate whether children with severe to moderate language delays could increase their verbal and nonverbal responses through the RECALL (Reading to Engage Children with Autism in Language and Literacy) dialogic reading method (Whalon et. al, 2013). Children ages 3-7 years (n = 8) with severe to moderate language delays from the H.I.L.L. program at the University of Mississippi participated in the study for six weeks. We utilized multiple-baseline and alternating baseline designs. During the intervention, the researcher read the book with the child and asked the child a completion, open-ended, wh-, wh-inference, or emotion identification question after each page. Results suggest that when children are provided more opportunities to respond (prompts), they increase both number and accuracy of responses. These results indicate that when combined with prompts, dialogic reading strategies can increase responses from children with moderate to severe speech and language delays.